Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice

http://www.towson.edu/sociology

Office

LA 3210, 410-704-2852
Fax: 410-704-2854

Programs of the Department

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice offers the following programs: the major in Sociology-Anthropology (SOAN) with a concentration in Anthropology, Sociology or Criminal Justice; the combined major in Sociology-Anthropology and Psychology; the combined major in Sociology-Anthropology and Geography and Environmental Planning; the minor in Anthropology; and the minor in Sociology.

Sociology-Anthropology majors are exposed to social science methods and perspectives needed to understand culture and society. All three concentrations emphasize theory, research methods and the linkages between individual experiences and social worlds. Students in the major learn valuable content knowledge and also develop important problem-solving, critical thinking, writing and analytical skills. The major’s three concentrations offer different perspectives on these general areas of knowledge and expertise. Students in the Anthropology Concentration examine the social and cultural patterns and the biological and cultural development of humans through time. Students in the Criminal Justice Concentration pursue the theoretical and empirical study of crime and criminality, other forms of social deviance and the official response to crime. Students in the Sociology Concentration study the scientific explanation and analysis of social processes and interaction, social structures and institutions, and social issues and problems.

The major prepares students for entry into a variety of occupations and for further study in many types of professional and graduate education programs. Examples of career areas (some requiring a graduate degree) routinely pursued by Sociology-Anthropology graduates include nonprofit and community organizations, research institutes and contract archaeology, museums, government agencies and politics, social services and social work, law and law enforcement, juvenile justice, victim assistance, conflict resolution and mediation, journalism and the mass media, and the corporate workplace. Our students are prepared to live and work in an increasingly complex and changing world. In addition, study in the department encourages and empowers students to be informed, engaged and responsible citizens.

The department actively encourages Sociology-Anthropology majors to pursue external learning experiences, including course-based service learning projects, study abroad and internships. Internships provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned in the classroom to workplace settings, allowing them to explore possible career avenues while adding valuable practical experience to their resumes. Students in the department have completed internships for course credit (ANTH 491/ANTH 492, CRMJ 491/CRMJ 492, SOCI 491/SOCI 492) in a variety of organizations and settings, including the American Red Cross; Baltimore Center for Urban Archaeology; the House of Ruth; local/regional circuit courts; local, regional and federal police and sheriff departments; the Neighborhood Design Center; Prisoner’s Aid; Sheppard Pratt; the Smithsonian Institution (Museum Support Center); and a variety of city, county, state and federal agencies. Interested students should contact the department for more information and to be directed to the appropriate internship coordinator.

The Departmental Honors Program (distinct from the Honors College and its requirements) provides students an opportunity to conduct an in-depth independent research study, under faculty guidance, culminating in an honors thesis. Students who complete the program graduate with honors in the department. Interested students should contact the department for more information. The department has active chapters of Alpha Kappa Delta, the national honor society in sociology (Theta chapter of Maryland, founded 1987), and Alpha Phi Sigma, the national honor society in criminal justice (Theta Delta chapter, established 2006). The department annually recognizes the outstanding achievements of students, with: the Lieberman Awards for the most distinguished student scholars in the major and for the most outstanding student intern; the Irwin Goldberg Award for Outstanding Achievement in Sociological Research; the Social Responsibility/Social Praxis (Action) Award; and the Award for Special Contribution to the Environment of Learning.

Major in Sociology-Anthropology

A minimum of 39 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course is required for the major in Sociology-Anthropology. No “pass” grades are accepted for the major. Courses in each concentration may be listed in more than one required section. Each course taken for the major will count toward one required section of the concentration only. Students may enroll in a maximum of 6 units of ANTH 495/CRMJ 495/SOCI 495.

The major degree students normally receive is the Bachelor of Science, but the Bachelor of Arts degree may be earned by adding a foreign language to the major requirements. The language requirements for the Bachelor of Arts can be met by completing the intermediate courses of a modern language or the equivalent. The Bachelor of Science degree is earned by completing department major and university degree requirements without meeting the foreign language requirements.

Majors in Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice

Minors in Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 207 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Introduction to social and cultural anthropology; cultural theory, social structure, human ecology, language and culture, technology, religion, art, and literature. GenEd II.D or Core: Global Perspectives.

ANTH 209 ANTHROPOLOGY OF AMERICAN CULTURE (3)

Applies the anthropological perspective and methodology to the study of the institutions of American culture and the distinctive ways of life encompassed by it. GenEd II.C.2 or Core: The United States as a Nation.

ANTH 210 HONORS CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Major social institutions,such as politics, economics, religion and social structure will be viewed cross-culturally. Honors College course. Special permit only. GenEd II.D or Core: Global Perspectives.

ANTH 211 HONORS ANTHROPOLOGY OF AMERICAN CULTURE (3)

Applies the anthropological perspective and methodology to the study of the institutions of American culture and the distinctive ways of life encompassed by it. Honors College course. Special permit only. GenEd II.C.2.

ANTH 212 PALEOANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (3)

The study of humans: their biological and cultural development through time. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 208. Core: Lab and Non-Lab Sciences or GenEd II.A.

ANTH 307 KOREA AND GLOBALIZATION (3)

Tensions and contradictions in Korean society and culture brought about by globalization; Koreans in diaspora, and Korea as a globalized, multicultural nation; Korean culture as a global commodity consumed outside of Korea. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 311 ARCHAEOLOGY OF MARYLAND (3)

Prehistory of Maryland from initial settlement until the European contact. Prerequisite: ANTH 208.

ANTH 321 ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER (3)

Anthropological analysis of gender in a global context, including contemporary forms of gender inequality and diverse meanings of gender across cultures; themes include gender, colonialism, and capitalism; the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class; kinship, nationalism, and reproduction; and gendered labor in the global economy. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or ANTH 207.

ANTH 325 MORAL PANICS (3)

Anthropological theories and methods used to analyze moral panics; role of the global media in the uclture of fear. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 327 ARCHAEOLOGY OF DEATH (3)

Examination of mortuary archaeology to understand how burials inform archaeologists about topics such as kinship, status, gender, politics, doctrines, and maintenance of social order in past societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 207 or ANTH 208/ANTH 212.

ANTH 328 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

An introduction to the methods, theory, and laboratory analyses of forensic anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 208/ANTH 212.

ANTH 331 ESKIMO ETHNOGRAPHY (3)

Survey of the social and cultural worlds of the Inuit (Eskimo). Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 341 INFORMATION AGE CULTURES (3)

Anthropological study of institutions, organizations and dilemmas common to an "information age." GenEd II.A. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 346 WEALTH, POWER AND POLITICS IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE (3)

Political systems and the distribution of power in egalitarian, ranked, and stratified societies will be examined. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or ANTH 207.

ANTH 351 DRUGS IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE (3)

Examines from an anthropological perspective drug production and organization of supply worldwide; its impact on the peoples, economy, polity, and cultures of involved countries; and the diversity of drug policies and national responses. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or ANTH 207.

ANTH 352 ANTHROPOLOGY OF MEDIA (3)

Ethnographic approaches to the analysis of media-based culture; media-based work of anthropologist and other cultural producers specific to various geographic locations. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 353 LATINAS IN THE AMERICAS (3)

Anthropological perspective stressing "emic" or insider view; structural constraints of class, gender, and race; women's agency is used to understand the diverse experiences of Latin American women with colonization, independence, revolution, development, and structural readjustment. Prerequisite: ANTH 207, ANTH 208, or WMST 231 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 357 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC CRIME ANALYSIS (3)

Forensic science with a focus on crime scene processing; consideration of the crime scene from an anthropological and archaeological perspective; general coverage of death investigation, latent prints, trace evidence, firemark and toolmark identification, impression evidence, and forensic computer analysis. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254 or ANTH 208 or SOCI 101; or open to majors in Forensic Chemistry.

ANTH 364 RELIGION, MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT (3)

The world view, beliefs, and rituals of selected non-literate peoples considered with reference to religion as a universal category of human culture. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 365 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3)

The traditional culture of native North Americans and their socio-cultural place in modern American society. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 366 SOUTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3)

Survey of the cultures of the native peoples of South America in Pre-Columbian times and the situation of contemporary tribal peoples of South America. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 367 PEOPLES OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3)

Survey of the Middle East as a cultural area with emphasis on culture change. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 368 GLOBALIZATION IN CROSS CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE (3)

Analyzes various approaches to globalization and examines the consequences of globalization and development among selected contemporary populations, primarily in the Southern countries of the world. Prerequisite: ANTH 207 or SOCI 101.

ANTH 369 TRADITION & REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA (3)

Legacies, both real and imagined, of revolution in contemporary politics and social change in Latin America; new forms of resistance and movements for social and economic justice in the Global South. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, ANTH 207, or ANTH 208.

ANTH 370 TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in anthropology, designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of six units. Prerequisite: ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 380 ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD METHODS (3)

The history, theory, and methods of ethnographic field research in anthropology. Current issues in anthropological fieldwork. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 381 ARCHEOLOGICAL METHODS AND THEORY (3)

Methods of excavating and recording archaeological data. Investigation of problems of current research interest. Prerequisite: ANTH 212.

ANTH 382 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Study of ethnographic media and representation of various cultures globally; theories and methods related to the production of various forms of visual anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 207.

ANTH 383 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3)

Regional survey of the prehistory of native North American cultures. Prerequisite: ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 385 ENVIRONMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY (3)

Analysis of pre-Columbian Native American environmental adaptations. Special focus on Ancestral Puebloans in the American Southwest. Prerequisite: ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 387 NATIVE AMERICAN ARCHAEOASTRONOMY (3)

Prehistoric roots of astronomy in the New World emphasizing the American Southwest. Celestial motions, calendar development, related folklore, and case studies concerning solstice and equinox observations. Prerequisite: ANTH 207 or ANTH 208.

ANTH 388 RETHINKING INDIGENEITY (3)

Indigenous traditions, ideals, and customs and their impact on contemporary law, economics, politics, and ways of life; how indigenous peoples organize and present themselves in national and global debates over citizenship, resource politics, and participatory democracy; anthropology's historical role in defining the indigenous "other" and recent politicization of the concept of indigeneity as a language to create change. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or ANTH 207.

ANTH 391 ARCHAEOLOGICAL LAB METHODS (3)

Artifact analyses from prehistoric site excavations; archaeological data analysis techniques. Prerequisite: ANTH 208.

ANTH 393 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL (3-6)

Fieldwork conducted in a prehistoric archaeological site in the Maryland area. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisite: ANTH 208.

ANTH 401 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3)

Survey of the theoretical contributions made by American, British and Continental anthropologists. Satisfies the university's second writing course requirement. Requires grade of C or better to fulfill Gen Ed or Core requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 102, ANTH 207, and 9 units of anthropology. GenEd I.D or Core: Advanced Writing Seminar.

ANTH 450 LIFE IN THE CITY (3)

Analysis of the history and socioeconomic conditions of domestic and foreign cities through the lens of urban anthropology; application of urban anthropology theory and methods to Baltimore city through fieldwork and civic engagement activities. Prerequisites: ANTH 207 and two upper-level cultural anthropology courses.

ANTH 457 ADVANCED FORENSIC INVESTIGATION (3)

Advanced methods and techniques used to process and interpret the crime scene, collect and package evidence, and prepare and present evidence in legal contexts. Coverage of forensic entomology, latent print development techniques, impression evidence casting and recovery, chemical enhancement of bloodstains, and forensic archaeology. Prerequisite: ANTH 357. Lab/Class fee will be assessed.

ANTH 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (1-3)

An examination of current topics in Anthropology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: ANTH 207 and 6 additional hours of anthropology.

ANTH 491 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY I (3)

Supervised experience in work setting which facilitates understanding of roles and relationships relevant to anthropological inquiry and application of anthropological knowledge. Although opportunities to do anthropologically oriented fieldwork in the community will usually be available, placement in agencies dedicated to anthropological inquiry may not always be possible. Students may elect to take one term for 3 units (ANTH 491) or two terms for 3 units each (ANTH 491 & ANTH 492), in one agency for both terms or in a different agency each term. No more than 3 units may be earned in a term without consent of the chair, which will be granted only when agency requirements and student needs make it appropriate. A fee is charged for each term a student is involved in the internship. Prerequisites: concentration in anthropology; junior standing and consent of internship coordinator.

ANTH 492 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY II (3)

Supervised experience in work setting which facilitates understanding of roles and relationships relevant to anthropological inquiry and application of anthropological knowledge. Although opportunities to do anthropologically oriented fieldwork in the community will usually be available, placement in agencies dedicated to anthropological inquiry may not always be possible. Students may elect to take one term for 3 units (ANTH 491) or two terms for 3 units each (ANTH 491 and ANTH 492), in one agency for both terms or in a different agency each semester. No more than 3 units may be earned in a term without consent of the chair, which will be granted only when agency requirements and student needs make it appropriate. A fee is charged for each term a student is involved in the internship. Prerequisites: concentration in anthropology; junior standing and consent of internship coordinator.

ANTH 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3)

Supervised research and anthropological investigation leading to preparation of a research project or a supervised field experience. For senior students with a concentration in anthropology. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: at least 12 units in ANTH and consent of department chair.

ANTH 498 READINGS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (HONORS) (4)

A survey of the relevant scholarly literature under the guidance of a staff member who will direct the student's research. Prerequisite: consent of the departmental honors coordinator.

ANTH 499 HONORS THESIS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (4)

Supervised research and anthropological investigation involving library and/or field experiences and culminating in a written report. Prerequisite: consent of the departmental honors coordinator.

Criminal Justice Courses

CRMJ 201 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY (3)

Overview of types of crime that occur in society; common explanations of crime; common misconceptions of crime; characteristics of offenders and victims; measurement of crime; social costs of crime and various social responses.

CRMJ 254 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

The history, the present structure, the functions, and the contemporary problems of the police, prosecution, courts, corrections system, probation and parole. A brief introduction to law as an element of social control will be given. GenEd II.B.3 or Core: The United States as a Nation.

CRMJ 307 ISSUES IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE (3)

Identification, treatment and prevention of home-based abuse or violence focusing on children, spouses/partners, and elders. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254 or SOCI 101.

CRMJ 309 ISSUES IN CAMPUS VIOLENCE (3)

Micro-level examination of issues of crime and violence, including prevention, treatment and punishment on the college campus. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254 or SOCI 101.

CRMJ 311 CRIME AND PUNISHMENT CROSS-NATIONALLY (3)

Examination of differences and similarities between U.S. and other nations' experiences of and responses to crime. Prerequisite: CRMJ 201, CRMJ 254, or SOCI 101.

CRMJ 313 BIOCRIME AND SECURITY (3)

Contemporary issues and controversies in criminal justice policy and practice related to biocrimes and other major security threats. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 315 MENTAL HEALTH, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Examination of the link between mental illness and crime as well as the treatment of mentally ill offenders within the criminal justice system, from a sociological perspective. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254 or SOCI 101.

CRMJ 317 JUSTICE AND CRIME (3)

Critical investigation of the meaning of justice and the implications it has for our society, the perpetration of crime, and the operation of the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and CRMJ 201 or CRMJ 254, and 6 additional hours of CRMJ.

CRMJ 331 CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND FILM (3)

Critical analysis of media portrayals of crime and the criminal justice system; consideration of related crime myths, wider images of justice, and other consequences for society; primary emphasis on visual media. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 332 CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Introduction to conflict analysis and resolution in the context of the criminal justice system; understanding, assessing, and remedying the causes and dynamics of social conflict particularly in the realm of law enforcement and corrections, such as hostage standoffs or prison riots. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 333 RESTORATIVE JUSTICE (3)

Theory and research of restorative justice practice including victim-offender mediation, community conferencing, and peacemaking circles; how restorative justice reframes traditional notions of justice in the criminal context. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 337 CONTROVERSIES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Contemporary issues and controversies in criminal justice philosophy, policy, and practice from the counting and reporting of crime to the rights of citizens, the dilemmas of victims, and the punishment of the perpetrator; implications of criminal justice policy upon the community. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 345 RACE AND CRIME (3)

Structural and cultural dimensions of race-specific patterns of criminal offending and victimization. Focus on urban development, social construction of race, and the political-economy of crime and social control in America. Prerequisite: CRMJ 244 or SOCI 101.

CRMJ 348 WOMEN AND CRIME (3)

Women as offenders, victims and workers in the criminal justice system. Theories of female criminality. Discrimination and sexism in juvenile and adult systems. Prerequisite: CRMJ 244 or SOCI 101.

CRMJ 352 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

Probation and intermediate sanctions of boot camp, electronic monitoring, house arrest/detention. Casework management and sentencing. Parole and diversion programs. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 353 THEORIES OF CRIME (3)

Evolution of criminological theory; crime rates and trends; social profile of criminal offenders and victims; societal responses. Prerequisites: SOCI 101, CRMJ 201, or CRMJ 254; and 9 additional units of CRMJ, SOCI, and/or ANTH.

CRMJ 354 WRITING FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

The components of the criminal justice system; police, courts, corrections. Theories of criminal justice applied to operations. Does not fulfill GenEd I.D when completed as SOCI 354. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 190. GenEd I.D.

CRMJ 355 DELINQUENCY AND JUVENILE JUSTICE (3)

Nature, distribution, and causes of youth crime; youth gangs; the juvenile justice system. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

CRMJ 356 PRISONS IN AMERICA (3)

Purposes of punishment; incarceration, and death penalty; inmate subculture; administration and staff issues. Prerequisites: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 358 INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE (3)

Face-to-face violent crime; perpetrators and victims; strategies for response. Prerequisites: SOCI 101.

CRMJ 368 RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Various steps in conducting research projects, from statement of the problem to final analysis of data, with focus on procedures used to study crime and criminal justice. Emphasis on the research techniques and the ethical issues involved. Prerequisites: CRMJ 254 and PSYC 212 or MATH 231 or ECON 205.

CRMJ 370 TOPICS IN CRIMINOLOGY (3)

Current topics in criminology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of six units provided a different topic is taken. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

CRMJ 375 TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Current topics in criminal justice designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for credit provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 384 ADVANCED CRIMINAL LAW (3)

Concepts of substantive criminal law through the case method approach; role of common law in the development of criminal law; examination of elements and types of crime, criminal actions, and defenses in relation to criminal law doctrines. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 385 POLICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

Law enforcement and organization structure; management of departments, including deployment, recruitment, training, specialization, budget and research. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 387 ISSUES IN POLICING (3)

Individual and system-related problems facing police personnel. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 393 ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Analysis of the ethical dilemmas that confront law enforcement, criminal law, and corrections professionals in the course of their daily work. Focus on both macro and micro level solutions. Prerequisite: CRMJ 254.

CRMJ 431 CRIMINAL JUSTICE OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM (3)

Integrates criminal justice issues related to reducing crime, reintegrating offenders, or responding to criminal victimization with real world projects designed by students in an external learning framework. Involves visiting and networking with community agencies in the criminal justice field. Prerequisites: CRMJ 254; SOCI 353 or CRMJ 353.

CRMJ 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in criminology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of six units provided a different topic is taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or CRMJ 244; and 6 additional units of CRMJ.

CRMJ 475 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

An examination of current topics in criminal justice designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of six units provided a different topic is taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or CRMJ 254; and 6 additional units of CRMJ.

CRMJ 485 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Capstone application of ideas, methods, and facts learned in previous criminology and criminal justice courses. Prerequisites: CRMJ 254; CRMJ 244; CRMJ 353 or SOCI 353; CRMJ 368 or SOCI 391; and Senior Standing; or consent of instructor.

CRMJ 491 INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE I (3)

Supervised experience in work setting which facilitates understanding of roles and relationships relevant to inquiry in criminal justice and criminology and application of knowledge in field. Students may elect to take one term for 3 units (CRMJ 491) or two terms for 3 units each (CRMJ 491 - CRMJ 492), in one agency both terms or in a different agency each term. No more than 3 units may be earned in a term without consent of the chair, which will be granted only when agency requirements and student needs make it appropriate. Prerequisites: SOAN majors only; CRMJ concentration; Junior Standing; and consent of instructor.

CRMJ 492 INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE II (3)

Supervised experience in work setting which facilitates understanding of roles and relationships relevant to inquiry in criminal justice and criminology and application of knowledge in field. Students may elect to take one term for 3 units (CRMJ 491) or two terms for 3 units each (CRMJ 491 and CRMJ 492), in one agency both terms or in a different agency each term. No more than 3 units may be earned in a term without consent of the chair, which will be granted only when agency requirements and student needs make it appropriate. Prerequisites: SOAN majors only; CRMJ concentration; Junior Standing; and consent of instructor.

CRMJ 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3)

Supervised research in criminology and criminal justice involving library and/or field experiences, and culminating in a written report. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: CRMJ 353 or SOCI 353; CRMJ 368 or SOCI 391; and consent of instructor.

CRMJ 497 HONORS SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Exploring and analyzing major areas in criminology and criminal justice. Prerequisite: Consent of CRMJ Honors Coordinator.

CRMJ 498 HONORS READINGS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4)

A survey of the relevant scholarly literature in criminology and criminal justice under the guidance of a faculty member who will direct the student's research. Prerequisite: Consent of CRMJ Honors Coordinator.

CRMJ 499 HONORS THESIS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4)

Supervised research and investigation in criminology and/or criminal justice involving library and/or field experience and culminating in a written report. Prerequisite: Consent of CRMJ Honors Coordinator.

Sociology Courses

SOCI 100 USING INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3)

Obtaining, evaluating, and presenting social science data with emphasis on critical thinking, search and analysis skills using computerized databases, statistical software and communication skills. Recommended for students majoring in social or behavioral sciences. Not open to those who successfully completed IDLA 101. GenEd I.B.

SOCI 101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3)

Sociological concepts, theories, methods; a study of society and culture; the influence of the social environment on individual behavior. GenEd II.C.2 or Core: Social & Behavioral Sciences.

SOCI 102 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3)

Sociological concepts, theories, methods; a study of society and culture; the influence of the social environment on individual behavior. Honors College course. GenEd II.C.2. or Core: Social & Behavioral Sciences.

SOCI 210 SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT (3)

Critical examination of the role of sport in society. Course material will transcend prevalent stereotypes and myths of sport and analyze significant realities of the culture, social and corporate organization, major social processes, and relations of class, race and gender in contemporary society. GenEd II.B.3 or Core: The United States as a Nation.

SOCI 212 SOCIAL STATISTICS (4)

Data analysis techniques used in sociology and criminal justice. Descriptive statistics, graphing, measures of central tendency and variability, association, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, regression, and statistical inference. SPSS or equivalent software package introduced as computational tool. Prerequisites: SOCI 101; MATH 109 or MATH 111; SOAN major or SOCI minor.

SOCI 241 BLACKS IN AMERICA:MYTHS AND REALITY (3)

Prevailing myths regarding black society, development of such myths and the reality which contradicts them. GenEd II.C.3 or Core: Diversity & Difference.

SOCI 243 SOCIOLOGY OF RACE, CLASS AND GENDER (3)

Traditional and contemporary sociological approaches to the nature and interrelationship of race, class, and gender inequalities. GenEd II.C.3 or Core: Diversity & Difference.

SOCI 249 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3)

Theoretical and empirical understanding of the sociological approach to contemporary social problems, such as alcoholism, drug abuse, rape, homophobia, sexism, racism, poverty, family disorganization, violence. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 265 STATUS, FRIENDSHIP, INTIMACY (3)

Effects of role position and expectations on behavior in friendship groups, work teams, couples, and families. Emphasis on systems of role positions and their enactment in interaction.

SOCI 300 SOCIOLOGICAL ANLYSIS (3)

Sociological perspectives, data and techniques needed to identify and interpret social and cultural patterns. Develops computer and writing skills. Requires grade of C or better to fulfill Core or GenEd requirement. Prerequisites: SOCI 101, ENGL 102 or ENGL 190 or consent of instructor. Core: Advanced Writing Seminar or GenEd I.D.

SOCI 301 THE FAMILY (3)

The family as the basic group in human societies; its development; its relation to other social institutions; the family in modern industrial societies. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 311 INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY (3)

A social psychological approach to the inter-relationships of the individual and his/her social and cultural environment; behavioral characteristics resulting from social experience. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 312 SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER (3)

Sociological analysis of gender primarily in American society, including as it relates to socialization, social interaction, inequality in the workplace, stereotypes in everyday life, and social institutions such as education, the family, and organizations. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 313 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

A general introduction to the inter-relationships between social organization and individual human behavior. Examination of social factors in the emergence of consciousness, self, personality, and interpersonal relations. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 323 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (3)

Exploration of the emergence, strategies, challenges, and outcomes of collective efforts to resist or promote social change. Emphasis on relationship between social movement organizations and major social institutions. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 324 SOCIOLOGY OF POPULAR CULTURE (3)

Sociological analysis of the sources and meanings of popular culture; production and consumption of popular culture objects, including music, film, and television; relationship of popular culture to high culture. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 326 RELIGION AND SOCIETY (3)

Connections between religious expression and practice and social contexts; classic and contemporary sociological theories of religion; role of religion in global society. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 327 URBAN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Survey of the theoretical and sociological conceptualizations of modern western industrial cities. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 329 DEMOGRAPHY (3)

Social, economic and political problems related to changes, distribution and movement of population; analysis of contemporary population trends in the United States and the world. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 331 DEVIANCE AND ORGANIZATIONS (3)

Major social patterns associated with contemporary large scale organizations, with special emphasis on deviance by and within corporations, governments and crime syndicates. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 333 POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY (3)

Contemporary relevance of the fundamental ideas regarding the relationship of the social and political systems; the significance of social and political democratization; class struggles and revolution; the influence of government bureaucracy. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 335 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY (3)

A study of social and cultural perspectives on illness; demographic trends; the health professions; institutions for the delivery of health care services. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 336 SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL ILLNESS (3)

Social structure of mental illness and mental health services; mental illness as social construction; life within total institutions; mental illness as social stigma; and social policy of mental illness. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 and PSYC 101.

SOCI 341 CLASS, STATUS AND POWER (3)

An examination of major theories and significant research on socially structured inequality in modern and traditional societies. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 343 SOCIOLOGY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY (3)

Race and ethnicity as social constructions; individual and collective racial and ethnic identities; racial and ethnic inequality; and resistance to oppression. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 351 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR (3)

Deviance as a process in society. Understanding conformity and deviance; identification and labeling of deviants; society's response to deviant behavior. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 353 THEORIES OF CRIME (3)

Evolution of criminological theory; crime rates and trends; social profile of criminal offenders and victims; societal responses. Prerequisites: SOCI 101, CRMJ 201, or CRMJ 254; and 9 additional units of CRMJ, SOCI, and/or ANTH.

SOCI 355 DELINQUENCY AND JUVENILE JUSTICE (3)

Nature, distribution and causes of youth crime; youth gangs; the juvenile justice system. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 357 SOCIAL WELFARE (3)

Sociological analysis of social welfare institutions and the functions they perform within modern societies. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 359 SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3)

Examination of social factors in aging in later life and responses to aging; evaluation of research in social gerontology. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 360 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING (3)

The study of the life cycle and the social significance of aging as well as the contemporary issues in social gerontology.

SOCI 362 WORK AND OCCUPATIONS (3)

Sociological theories and research on work and occupations; conceptions of work, occupation and profession; historical and contemporary issues in work and occupations; trends in blue and white-collar industries; the relationship between work and the self; implications of the modern distinction between work and family. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 365 ORGANIZATIONS AND SOCIETY (3)

Major social patterns associated with contemporary organizations; diversity and common elements among organizations; formal and informal aspects of bureaucracies; the growth of rationalization and McDonaldization; the impact and place of organizations in modern life. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 370 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 371 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered.

SOCI 372 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 373 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 374 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 375 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 376 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 377 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 378 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 379 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Current topics in sociology designed for non-majors as well as majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 381 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY (3)

Major systems of sociological theory; the works, assumptions, and implications of major European and American schools. Prerequisites: junior standing; SOCI 101; 9 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 383 SOCIOLOGY OF LAW (3)

Legal norms and institutions in relation to society; role of law in social processes, such as conflict and cooperation. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

SOCI 391 RESEARCH METHODS (3)

A consideration of methodology of sociological research; the various steps in conducting research projects, from statement of the problem to final analysis of data. Prerequisites: SOCI 101; 9 additional units of SOCI; and either SOCI 212, PSYC 212, MATH 231, or ECON 205.

SOCI 440 SOCIOLOGY OF IMMIGRATION (3)

Examination of sociological theories and research regarding immigration; emphasis on the contemporary context in the United States and globally. Prerequisites: SOCI 101; one 300-level SOCI course.

SOCI 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 471 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 472 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 473 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 474 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional hours of sociology.

SOCI 475 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 476 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 477 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 478 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Preerquisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 479 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

An examination of current topics in Sociology designed for junior and senior majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and 6 additional units of sociology.

SOCI 485 SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Capstone application of ideas, methods and facts learned in previous sociology courses. Prerequisites: SOCI 101, three upper-level SOCI courses, and senior standing or permission of instructor.

SOCI 491 INTERNSHIP IN SOCIOLOGY I (3)

Supervised experience in work setting which facilitates understanding of roles and relationships relevant to sociological inquiry and application of sociological knowledge. Students may elect to take one term for 3 units (SOCI 491) or two terms for 3 units each (SOCI 491 and SOCI 492), in one agency both terms or in a different agency each term. No more than 3 units may be earned in a term without consent of the chair, which will be granted only when agency requirements and student needs make it appropriate. Prerequisites: SOCI major; junior standing and consent of internship coordinator.

SOCI 492 INTERNSHIP IN SOCIOLOGY II (3)

Supervised experience in work setting which facilitates understanding of roles and relationships relevant to sociological inquiry and application of sociological knowledge. Students may elect to take one term for 3 units (SOCI 491) or two terms for 3 units each (SOCI 491 and SOCI 492), in one agency both terms or in a different agency each term. No more than 3 units may be earned in a term without consent of the chair, which will be granted only when agency requirements and student needs make it appropriate. Prerequisites: SOCI major; junior standing and consent of internship coordinator.

SOCI 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)

Supervised research and sociological investigation involving library and/or field experiences, and culminating in a written report. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units . Prerequisites: SOCI 381 and SOCI 391 and consent of instructor.

SOCI 497 SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY (HONORS) (3)

Exploring and analyzing major areas of sociology. Prerequisite: consent of the departmental Honors coordinator.

SOCI 498 HONORS READINGS IN SOCIOLOGY (4)

A survey of the relevant scholarly literature under the guidance of a staff member who will direct the student's research. Prerequisite: consent of the departmental Honors coordinator.

SOCI 499 HONORS THESIS IN SOCIOLOGY (4)

Supervised research and sociological investigation involving library and/or field experiences and culminating in a written report. Prerequisite: consent of the departmental Honors coordinator.

Faculty

Professors: Carol Caronna, Elizabeth Clifford (Chairperson), Samuel Collins, Matthew Durington, Douglas Pryor, Miriam Sealock (Assistant Chair)

Associate Professors: Michael Elliott, Nicole Fabricant, Victor Fisher, Brian Gorman, Marion Hughes, Jennifer Langdon, Michelle Manasse, Paul Munroe, William Tsitsos

Assistant Professors: Elyshia Aseltine, Marion Cockey, Jonathan Gaines, Harjant Gill, Miho Iwata, Jeff Larson

Senior Lecturer: Whitney Garcia

Lecturers: Laura Hahn, Stephen Hartmark, John Skinner, Robert Wall

Clinical Assistant Professor: Dana Kollmann

Visiting Assistant Professor: Maria Joao Antunes