Major in Mathematics - Secondary Education Concentration

Mathematics majors in the Secondary Education Concentration are eligible, upon graduation, to apply for certification to teach mathematics for grades 7-12 in the state of Maryland.

The mathematics secondary education concentration requires 119–122 units for completion. Students must complete 52 required units in content courses, 24 required units in Towson UTeach courses, 30 required units in Core Curriculum courses not satisfied by the major, and 13 required units in their final internship and seminar, earning a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course.

Standards for Teacher Education

The Teacher Education Executive Board, representing all initial teacher education programs at Towson University, utilizes the following minimum requirements as conditions for admission into teacher education programs, maintaining candidate status and formal entry into the capstone internship. Programs may include additional requirements for admission into the program and/or the capstone internship.

The College of Education admits students either as freshmen or as undergraduate transfer students from accredited, post-secondary institutions. During the freshman and sophomore years, students are generally engaged in pre-professional courses or courses that fulfill Core Curriculum requirements, as well as all identified prerequisites (e.g., specific and sequential courses in Core Curriculum) for admission to COE screened majors and programs.

All College of Education undergraduate programs are screened majors. As an integral part of the teaching/learning experience, students work with advisers in a strategic planning process across all years at TU. Accordingly, to support student success, all COE students are required to confer prior to registration each term with their assigned advisers.

I. PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO ALL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS

  1. Complete a self-disclosure criminal background form to be submitted to the major department with the application. 
  2. Submit an application for formal admission to the program. Students seeking admission to teacher education programs must contact their department chairperson or program coordinator by 45 credit hours for program-specific procedures and requirements for admission to professional education programs.
  3. A cumulative/overall GPA of 3.00 or higher is required for admission to an initial licensure teacher education program.

    1. Applicants with a GPA between 2.50 - 2.99 may be admitted conditionally if they provide evidence of passing scores on a Basic Skills Assessment* as identified by the Maryland State Department of Education (i.e. SAT, ACT, GRE, Praxis Core) and receive approval from the department chairperson/program coordinator.

      *Candidates may apply for a test waiver directly to the department. Such waivers should only be granted if it is predicted, based on the individual candidate’s transcript data, that the candidate’s final cumulative/overall GPA will be above a 3.00.

II. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAINTAINING CANDIDATE STATUS

  1. Maintain a semester GPA of 3.00 in required education courses for all programs.  
    1. At the department’s discretion, candidates who do not meet the above GPA requirement may continue for one additional semester under probationary status, but must meet the 3.00 GPA requirement at the end of the probationary period. If the GPA requirement is not met at the end of the probationary period, the candidate would be dismissed from the program.
  2. Obtain a grade of C or better in academic major coursework applicable only in programs requiring an academic major. (Middle School; Secondary; Art, Dance, Health, Music, World Languages, Physical Education).
  3. Exhibit behavior that is consistent with the University’s Code of Student Conduct, the Educator Preparation Program’s Professional Behavior Policy, and established professional practice in educational and clinical settings. (see COE Behavior Policy)

III. PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRY INTO CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP FOR ALL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

  1. Complete a criminal background check as required by the school system in which the internship is located.
  2. Complete all required coursework.

The Standards were revised and approved in February 1996, May 1998, February 2000, May 2007, May 2008, April 2009, December 2011, November 2012, February 2014, October 2014, February 2015, November 2015, May 2019, February 2020, and March 2021.

Mathematics Major Requirements

All Mathematics majors must take the following required courses.  

Required Courses
MATH 265ELEMENTARY LINEAR ALGEBRA4
MATH 267INTRODUCTION TO ABSTRACT MATHEMATICS4
MATH 273CALCULUS I4
MATH 274CALCULUS II4
MATH 275CALCULUS III4
Total Units20

Mathematics Secondary Education Requirements

In addition to the 20 units of common requirements for all Mathematics majors, the Mathematics Secondary Education concentration requires 29-31 units of concentration requirements and 40 units of Towson UTeach course requirements for a total of 89-91 units. MATH 423, MATH 426, SEMS 498 and minimum four additional upper-level courses in the major must be taken at Towson University. 

Minimum requirements for admission into teacher education programs, maintaining candidate status and formal entry into the capstone internship are outlined on the Standards for Teacher Education page in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

Required Courses
MATH 223PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS2
MATH 330INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL METHODS4
MATH 353EUCLIDEAN AND NON-EUCLIDEAN GEOMETRIES3
MATH 369INTRODUCTION TO ABSTRACT ALGEBRA4
MATH 420APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS3
MATH 423TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS 13
PHYS 241GENERAL PHYSICS I CALCULUS-BASED4
Electives
Select two of the following:6-8
APPLIED COMBINATORICS
TEACHING ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS FOR PRESERVICE TEACHERS
GENERAL PHYSICS II CALCULUS-BASED
PROBABILITY
REAL ANALYSIS I
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
GRAPH THEORY
NUMBER THEORY
ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES
COMPLEX ANALYSIS
Total Units29-31

Towson UTeach Course Requirements

Introductory Towson UTeach Courses
Students must complete either
SEMS 110
SEMS 120
INTRODUCTION TO STEM TEACHING I: INQUIRY APPROACHES TO TEACHING
and INTRODUCTION TO STEM TEACHING II: INQUIRY-BASED LESSON DESIGN
2
or SEMS 130 INTRODUCTION TO STEM TEACHING I & II COMBINED
*Permission of Towson UTeach Department required to take SEMS 130.
Towson UTeach Courses
SEMS 230KNOWING AND LEARNING3
SEMS 240CLASSROOMS INTERACTIONS3
SEMS 250PERSPECTIVES IN SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS3
SEMS 370PROJECT-BASED INSTRUCTION3
SEMS 498INTERNSHIP IN MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE SECONDARY EDUCATION 13
SCED 460USING LITERACY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS4
SCED 461TEACHING READING IN THE SECONDARY CONTENT AREAS3
Towson UTeach Courses - Mathematics
MATH 310FUNCTIONS AND MODELING FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS3
MATH 426INTERNSHIP IN SECONDARY EDUCATION - MATHEMATICS 112
SEMS 430SEMINAR IN APPRENTICE TEACHING1
Total Units40
1

MATH 423, MATH 426 and SEMS 498 must be taken at Towson University. 

Departmental Honors Program

The Department of Mathematics offers a departmental honors program for students who demonstrate exemplary abilities in mathematics. The program provides students with an opportunity to work closely with faculty mentors in an individual program of research, directed readings and independent study.

Graduation with departmental honors requires a minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.33, and successful completion of a two-course research sequence and an honors thesis in mathematics (MATH 499). Departmental honors will be posted to the transcript shortly after the bachelor’s degree is conferred.

Required Coursework for Departmental Honors in Mathematics
Research Sequence, Select one of the following:6
READINGS IN MATHEMATICS
and RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS
READINGS IN MATH EDUCATION
and INDEPENDENT STUDY: RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION
APPLIED MATHEMATICS LABORATORY I
and APPLIED MATHEMATICS LABORATORY II
Thesis Requirement
MATH 499HONORS THESIS IN MATHEMATICS1
Total Units7

Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 2734MATH 2654
SEMS 1101MATH 274 (Core 3)4
Core 1 (or Core 2)3SEMS 1201
Core 43Core 2 (or Core 1)3
Core 63Core 113
Core 103 
 17 15
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 2232PHYS 241 (Core 7)4
MATH 2674MATH 3694
MATH 2754SEMS 2403
SEMS 2303Core 133
Core 123Core 143
 16 17
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 3304MATH 310 (Core 9)3
MATH 3533MATH 4203
SCED 4604MATH Elective3-4
SEMS 250 (Core 5)3SEMS 3703
Core 83-4 
 17-18 12-13
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 4233MATH 42612
MATH Elective3-4SEMS 4301
SCED 4613 
SEMS 4983 
 12-13 13
Total Units 119-122

Standard 1: Knowledge of Mathematical Problem Solving

Candidates know, understand, and apply the process of mathematical problem solving.
Indicators
1.1 Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems.
1.2 Solve problems that arise in mathematics and those involving mathematics in other contexts.
1.3 Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.
1.4 Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving.

Standard 2: Knowledge of Reasoning and Proof

Candidates reason, construct, and evaluate mathematical arguments and develop an appreciation for mathematical rigor and inquiry.
Indicators
2.1 Recognize reasoning and proof as fundamental aspects of mathematics.
2.2 Make and investigate mathematical conjectures.
2.3 Develop and evaluate mathematical arguments and proofs.
2.4 Select and use various types of reasoning and methods of proof.

Standard 3: Knowledge of Mathematical Communication

Candidates communicate their mathematical thinking orally and in writing to peers, faculty, and others.
Indicators
3.1 Communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, faculty, and others.
3.2 Use the language of mathematics to express ideas precisely.
3.3 Organize mathematical thinking through communication.
3.4 Analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others.

Standard 4: Knowledge of Mathematical Connections

Candidates recognize, use, and make connections between and among mathematical ideas and in contexts outside mathematics to build mathematical understanding.
Indicators
4.1 Recognize and use connections among mathematical ideas.
4.2 Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.
4.3 Demonstrate how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole.

Standard 5: Knowledge of Mathematical Representation

Candidates use varied representations of mathematical ideas to support and deepen student’s mathematical understanding.
Indicators
5.1 Use representations to model and interpret physical, social, and mathematical phenomena.
5.2 Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.
5.3 Select, apply, and translate among mathematical representations to solve problems.

Standard 6: Knowledge of Technology

Candidates embrace technology as an essential tool for teaching and learning mathematics.Indicator
6.1 Use knowledge of mathematics to select and use appropriate technological tools, such as but not limited to, spreadsheets, dynamic graphing tools, computer algebra systems, dynamic statistical packages, graphing calculators, data-collection devices, and presentation software.

Standard 7: Dispositions

Candidates support a positive disposition toward mathematical processes and mathematical learning.
Indicators
7.1 Attention to equity
7.2 Use of stimulating curricula
7.3 Effective teaching
7.4 Commitment to learning with understanding
7.5 Use of various assessments
7.6 Use of various teaching tools including technology

Pedagogy (Standard 8)
In addition to knowing students as learners, mathematics teacher candidates should develop knowledge of and ability to use and evaluate instructional strategies and classroom organizational models, ways to represent mathematical concepts and procedures, instructional materials and resources, ways to promote discourse, and means of assessing student understanding. This section on pedagogy is to address this knowledge and skill.

Standard 8: Knowledge of Mathematics Pedagogy

Candidates possess a deep understanding of how students learn mathematics and of the pedagogical knowledge specific to mathematics teaching and learning.
Indicators
8.1 Selects, uses, and determines suitability of the wide variety of available mathematics curricula and teaching materials for all students including those with special needs such as the gifted, challenged and speakers of other languages.
8.2 Selects and uses appropriate concrete materials for learning mathematics.
8.3 Uses multiple strategies, including listening to and understanding the ways students think about mathematics, to assess students mathematical knowledge.
8.4 Plans lessons, units and courses that address appropriate learning goals, including those that address local, state, and national mathematics standards and legislative mandates.
8.5 Participates in professional mathematics organizations and uses their print and on-line resources.
8.6 Demonstrates knowledge of research results in the teaching and learning of mathematics.
8.7 Uses knowledge of different types of instructional strategies in planning mathematics lessons.
8.8 Demonstrates the ability to lead classes in mathematical problem solving and in developing in-depth conceptual understanding, and to help students develop and test generalizations.
8.9 Develop lessons that use technology’s potential for building understanding of mathematical concepts and developing important mathematical ideas.

Content (Standards 9-15)
Candidates comfort with, and confidence in, their knowledge of mathematics affects both what they teach and how they teach it. Knowing mathematics includes understanding specific concepts and procedures as well as the process of doing mathematics. That knowledge is the subject of the following standards.

Standard 9: Knowledge of Number and Operation

Candidates demonstrate computational proficiency, including a conceptual understanding of numbers, ways of representing number, relationships among number and number systems, and meanings of operations.
Indicators
9.1 Analyze and explain the mathematics that underlies the procedures used for operations involving integers, rational, real, and complex numbers.
9.2 Use properties involving number and operations, mental computation, and computational estimation.
9.3 Provide equivalent representations of fractions, decimals, and percents.
9.4 Create, solve, and apply proportions.
9.5 Apply the fundamental ideas of number theory.
9.6 Make sense of large and small numbers and use scientific notation.
9.7 Compare and contrast properties of numbers and number systems.
9.8 Represent, use, and apply complex numbers.
9.9 Recognize matrices and vectors as systems that have some of the properties of the real number system.
9.10 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of number and number systems including contributions from diverse cultures.

Standard 10: Knowledge of Different Perspectives on Algebra

Candidates emphasize relationships among quantities including functions, ways of representing mathematical relationships, and the analysis of change.
Indicators
10.1 Analyze patterns, relations, and functions of one and two variables.
10.2 Apply fundamental ideas of linear algebra.
10.3 Apply the major concepts of abstract algebra to justify algebraic operations and formally analyze algebraic structures.
10.4 Use mathematical models to represent and understand quantitative relationships.
10.5 Use technological tools to explore algebraic ideas and representations of information and in solving problems.
10.6 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of algebra including contributions from diverse cultures.

Standard 11: Knowledge of Geometries

Candidates use spatial visualization and geometric modeling to explore and analyze geometric shapes, structures, and their properties.
Indicators
11.1 Demonstrate knowledge of core concepts and principles of Euclidean and non- Euclidean geometries in two and three dimensions from both formal and informal perspectives.
11.2 Exhibit knowledge of the role of axiomatic systems and proofs in geometry.
11.3 Analyze characteristics and relationships of geometric shapes and structures.
11.4 Build and manipulate representations of two- and three- dimensional objects and visualize objects from different perspectives.
11.5 Specify locations and describe spatial relationships using coordinate geometry, vectors, and other representational systems.
11.6 Apply transformations and use symmetry, similarity, and congruence to analyze mathematical situations.
11.7 Use concrete models, drawings, and dynamic geometric software to explore geometric ideas and their applications in real-world contexts.
11.8 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of Euclidean and non- Euclidean geometries including contributions from diverse cultures.

Standard 12: Knowledge of Calculus

Candidates demonstrate a conceptual understanding of limit, continuity, differentiation, and integration and a thorough background in the techniques and application of the calculus.
Indicators
12.1 Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with basic calculus concepts.
12.2 Apply concepts of function, geometry, and trigonometry in solving problems involving calculus.
12.3 Use the concepts of calculus and mathematical modeling to represent and solve problems taken from real-world contexts.
12.4 Use technological tools to explore and represent fundamental concepts of calculus.
12.5 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of calculus including contributions from diverse cultures.

Standard 13: Knowledge of Discrete Mathematics

Candidates apply the fundamental ideas of discrete mathematics in the formulation and solution of problems.
Indicators
13.1 Demonstrate knowledge of basic elements of discrete mathematics such as graph theory, recurrence relations, finite difference approaches, linear programming, and combinatorics.
13.2 Apply the fundamental ideas of discrete mathematics in the formulation and solution of problems arising from real-world situations.
13.3 Use technological tools to solve problems involving the use of discrete structures and the application of algorithms.
13.4 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of discrete mathematics including contributions from diverse cultures.

Standard 14: Knowledge of Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of concepts and practices related to data analysis, statistics, and probability.
Indicators
14.1 Design investigations, collect data, and use a variety of ways to display data and interpret data representations that may include bivariate data, conditional probability and geometric probability.
14.2 Use appropriate methods such as random sampling or random assignment of treatments to estimate population characteristics, test conjectured relationships among variables, and analyze data.
14.3 Use appropriate statistical methods and technological tools to describe shape and analyze spread and center.
14.4 Use statistical inference to draw conclusions from data.
14.5 Identify misuses of statistics and invalid conclusions from probability.
14.6 Draw conclusions involving uncertainty by using hands-on and computer-based simulation for estimating probabilities and gathering data to make inferences and conclusions.
14.7 Determine and interpret confidence intervals.
14.8 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of statistics and probability including contributions from diverse cultures.

Standard 15: Knowledge of Measurement

Candidates apply and use measurement concepts and tools.
Indicators
15.1 Recognize the common representations and uses of measurement and choose tools and units for measuring.15.2 Apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements and their application in a variety of contexts.
15.3 Completes error analysis through determining the reliability of the numbers obtained from measures.
15.4 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of measurement and measurement systems including contributions from diverse cultures.

Field-Based Experiences (Standard 16)
The development of mathematics teacher candidates should include opportunities to examine the nature of mathematics, how it should be taught and how students learn mathematics; observe and analyze a range of approaches to mathematics teaching and learning, focusing on the tasks, discourse, environment and assessment; and work with a diverse range of students individually, in small groups, and in large class settings.

Standard 16: Field-Based Experiences

Candidates complete field-based experiences in mathematics classrooms.
Indicators
16.1 Engage in a sequence of planned opportunities prior to student teaching that includes observing and participating in both middle and secondary mathematics classrooms under the supervision of experienced and highly qualified teachers.
16.2 Experience full-time student teaching in secondary mathematics that is supervised by a highly qualified teacher and a university or college supervisor with secondary mathematics teaching experience.
 16.3 Demonstrate the ability to increase students’ knowledge of mathematics.