Major in Philosophy

The Philosophy major requires completion of 36 units with a grade equivalent of 2.00 in all courses.

Section A: Required Courses
PHIL 101INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY3
PHIL 111INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC3
Section B: Required Courses
Select three of the following:9
PLATO AND HIS PREDECESSORS
ARISTOTLE AND HIS SUCCESSORS
TWENTIETH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY
EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY
LATE MODERN PHILOSOPHY
ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY
Section C: Required Courses
Select one of the following:3
PHILOSOPHIES OF INDIA
PHILOSOPHIES OF CHINA & JAPAN
AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY
Section D: Required Courses
Select two of the following:6
SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
RACE, CLASS AND GENDER
ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
PHILOSOPHY OF THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY
PLATO'S ETHICS
ETHICS
WHAT MAKES US MORAL
BIOMEDICAL ETHICS
Section E: Required Courses
Select two of the following:6
NIETZSCHE
SYMBOLIC LOGIC
MIND AND CONSCIOUSNESS
PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
PHILOSOPHY OF LAW
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
PHILOSOPHY AND FILM
THEORIES OF KNOWLEDGE
AESTHETICS
PHILOSOPHICAL TOPICS
Section F: Electives
Select two of the following:6
PHENOMENOLOGY
EXISTENTIALISM
KANT
PHILOSOPHICAL SYSTEMS
WRITNG SEMINAR IN PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES
PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS
RESEARCH TUTORIAL IN PHILOSOPHY
Total Units36

Departmental Honors Program

The Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies offers a departmental honors program for students who demonstrate exemplary abilities in philosophy. Students pursuing this option are required to complete PHIL 498 with a minimum grade of A-. Completion of  PHIL 498 requires students to produce and defend a 15-20 page paper presenting substantial research in philosophy.

Applicants for departmental honors must have earned 75 units with a minimum 3.50 cumulative GPA, including 18 units in Philosophy courses. In addition, applicants must find a faculty advisor to guide the thesis research and evaluate the final paper and thesis defense. Departmental honors will be posted to the transcript shortly after the bachelor’s degree is conferred.

To apply for departmental honors, students must complete an application with the department. Students who wish to take PHIL 498 in the Fall term should apply during the previous spring by March 1st.  Students who wish to take PHIL 498 in the Spring term should apply during the previous Fall by Oct. 1st. 

Required Coursework for Departmental Honors In Philosophy
PHIL 498HONORS THESIS RESEARCH 13
1

PHIL 498 does not count towards the Philosophy major requirements. Students pursuing departmental honors will be required to take 39 units rather than 36.

Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
PHIL 1013PHIL 111 (Section A) (Core 5)3
Core 1 (or Core 2)3Core 2 (or Core 1)3
Core 33Core 83-4
Core 63Core 103
Core 74Core 113
 16 15-16
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
One course from Section B3One course from Section B3
One course from Section B3One course from Section C3
Core 93Core 133
Core 123Core 143
Core or Elective3Elective3
 15 15
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
One course from Section D3One course from Section D3
One course from Section F3One course from Section E3
Core or Elective3Core or Elective3
Elective3Elective3
Elective3Elective3
 15 15
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
One course from Section E3Core 43
One course from Section F3Elective3
Elective3Elective3
Elective3Elective3
Elective3Elective3
 15 15
Total Units 121-122
  1. Philosophically explain and discuss theories and concepts of the major thinkers of schools in Western philosophy.
  2. Philosophically explain and discuss culturally diverse philosophical traditions.
  3. Engage in a philosophical discussion of social and/or political and/or moral issues.
  4. Think philosophically, i.e., to analyze, articulate, synthesize, and/or creatively develop arguments, concepts and theories.
  5. Practice inductive and deductive reasoning, the composition of argument and demonstration, and the detection of formal and informal fallacies.