Major in Middle School Education

This is a screened program. Please see the admission requirements for additional information.

Students interested in teaching Middle School students (Grades 4-9) should contact the Department of Secondary & Middle School Education. Middle School Education majors must select two content areas from the following: English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies/History, which leads to Maryland State Teacher Certification in Middle School in both of the content areas selected. The Pass (PS) grading option may not be used for any of the courses listed below. 

Minimum requirements for admission into teacher education programs, maintaining candidate status and formal entry into the capstone internship are outlined on the Standards for Teacher Education page in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

Mathematics Content Required Courses

MATH 215RATIONAL NUMBERS AND PROPORTIONAL REASONING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS TEACHERS4
MATH 225ALGEBRA AND NUMBER CONCEPTS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS4
MATH 231BASIC STATISTICS3
MATH 236PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER PREPARATION1
MATH 255GEOMETRY FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS4
MATH 273CALCULUS I4
MATH 325MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM SOLVING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3
Content Methods
MATH 425MATHEMATICS TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL3
Total Units26

Science Content Required Courses

BIOL 120
120L
PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY [LECTURE]
and PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY [LAB]
4
BIOL 301FIELD AND NATURAL SCIENCE3
CHEM 121
121L
ALLIED HEALTH CHEMISTRY I LECTURE
and ALLIED HEALTH CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY
4
GEOG 101PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY3
PHYS 205PHYSICS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3
PHSC 206EARTH-SPACE SCIENCE FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS3
SCIE 355TEACHING ENGINEERING DESIGN IN SCIENCE EDUCATION2
Content Methods
SCIE 381TEACHING SCIENCE AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL LEVEL3
Total Units25

Social Studies Content Required Courses

ANTH 207CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3
or ANTH 209 ANTHROPOLOGY OF AMERICAN CULTURE
ECON 201MICROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES3
GEOG 102WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY3
or GEOG 105 GEOGRAPHY OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
GEOG 109INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY3
HIST 145HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE CIVIL WAR3
HIST 146HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE THE CIVIL WAR3
or HIST 102 EUROPE: FROM THE AGE OF CAESAR TO THE AGE OF CALVIN, FIRST TO SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
HIST 160WORLD HISTORY BEFORE 13003
HIST 161WORLD HISTORY SINCE 13003
POSC 103AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT3
SOCI 101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3
SOSC 401TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE3
Content Methods
MSED 365TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL3
Total Units36

English Content Required Courses

American Literature
ENGL 238SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE3
British Literature
ENGL 221BRITISH LITERATURE TO 17983
or ENGL 222 BRITISH LITERATURE SINCE 1798
Diversity in American Literature
Select one of the following:3
SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
MAJOR WRITERS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
ETHNIC-AMERICAN LITERATURE
AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE, 1772-PRESENT
MODERN JEWISH LITERATURE
Linguistics and Grammar
ENGL 251APPLIED GRAMMAR3
World Literature/Non-Western Literature
Select one of the following:3
INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY
WORLD FOLKLORE
LITERATURE OF GLOBAL EXPERIENCE
HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT
FOLKLORE AND LITERATURE
MYTH AND LITERATURE
WORLD LITERATURE WRITTEN IN ENGLISH
Advanced Writing
Select one of the following:3
WRITING ARGUMENT
ACADEMIC ESSAY
WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
WOMEN'S WORDS, WOMEN'S LIVES
Adolescent Literature
SCED 419YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE3
Content Methods
MSED 367TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL3
Total Units24

Required Professional Education Courses for Middle School Education

EDUC 202HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES: AMERICA'S URBAN SCHOOLS3
EDUC 203TEACHING AND LEARNING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY3
SCED 304EDUCATION, ETHICS AND CHANGE3
SCED 305ADOLESCENT LEARNING, DEVELOPMENT, AND DIVERSITY (Prerequisite: PSYC 101)3
ISTC 301INTEGRATING INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY3
SPED 301INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION3
MSED 342PRINCIPLES OF MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION4
SCED 460USING LITERACY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS 14
SCED 461TEACHING READING IN THE SECONDARY CONTENT AREAS (taken concurrently with SCED 499)3
SCED 499INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION 26
Internship (Taken in 2 Content Areas for 6 units each)12
INTERNSHIP IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION IN ENGLISH
INTERNSHIP IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION IN HISTORY
INTERNSHIP IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION IN SCIENCE
INTERNSHIP IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION IN MATH
SCED 401ANALYZING THE INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE (taken concurrently with Student Teaching or the Full-Time Internship)3
Total Units50
1

Taken concurrently with MSED 342 and shares a required field experience

2

Taken at a professional development school in the fall term. Taken concurrently with Methods of Teaching in the content areas. (See Content Areas in the above listings.)

The Professional Year and Full Time Internship

All teacher candidates conduct their internship in Professional Development Schools (PDS). These are schools in which there is a partnership between the schools and the Department of Secondary and Middle School Education (SMED) in the College of Education (COE). All students wishing to enroll in their internship courses must meet with their Middle School advisor to receive permission to register. Students will not be admitted to the internship without prior approval of an advisor.

English / Science Content Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ENGL 221 or 222 (Core 5)3BIOL 120
120L (Core 7)
4
Core 1 (or Core 2)3EDUC 202 (Core 10)3
Core 33GEOG 101 (Core 8)3
Core 43Core 1 (or Core 2)3
Core 6 (PSYC 101 Recommended) 3 
 15 13
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
CHEM 121
121L
4ENGL 233, 234, 235, 236, or 2393
EDUC 203 (Core 13)3ENGL 2513
ENGL 238 (Core 11)3ISTC 3013
ENGL 310, 313, 316, or WMST 333 (Core 9)3SPED 3013
Core 123SCED 3053
 16 15
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
BIOL 3013MSED 3424
ENGL 243, 244, 248, 341, 342, 343, or 3473PHYS 2053
SCED 304 (Core 14)3PHSC 2063
SCIE 3552SCED 4193
Elective3SCED 4604
 14 17
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MSED 3673MSED Student Teaching12
SCED 4613SCED 4013
SCED 4996 
SCIE 3813 
 15 15
Total Units 120

English / Math Content Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ENGL 221 or 222 (Core 5)3EDUC 202 (Core 10)3
MATH 273 (Core 3)4MATH 2154
Core 1 (or Core 2)3Core 2 (or Core 1)3
Core 43Core 73
Core 6 (PSYC 101 Recommended) 3Core 123
 16 16
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
EDUC 203 (Core 13)3ENGL 233, 234, 235, 236, or 2393
ENGL 238 (Core 11)3ENGL 2513
MATH 2254ISTC 3013
Core 83MATH 2313
 MATH 2361
 SPED 3013
 13 16
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ENGL 243, 244, 248, 341, 342, 343, or 3473MATH 3253
ENGL 310, 313, 316, or WMST 333 (Core 9)3MSED 3424
MATH 2554SCED 3053
SCED 304 (Core 14)3SCED 4193
 SCED 4604
 13 17
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 4253MSED Student Teaching12
MSED 3673SCED 4013
SCED 4613 
SCED 4996 
 15 15
Total Units 121

English / Social Studies Content Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ENGL 221 or 222 (Core 5)3GEOG 102 or 105 (Core 12)3
ENGL 238 (Core 11)3HIST 1453
Core 1 (or Core 2)3SOCI 101 (Core 6)3
Core 33Core 2 (or Core 1)3
Core 43Core 83
 15 15
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ANTH 2073EDUC 202 (Core 10)3
ECON 2013ENGL 233, 234, 235, 236, or 2393
EDUC 203 (Core 13)3ENGL 310, 313, 316, or WMST 333 (Core 9)3
HIST 146 or 1023GEOG 1093
POSC 1033ISTC 3013
 HIST 1603
 15 18
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ENGL 243, 244, 248, 341, 342, 343, or 3473MSED 3424
ENGL 2513SCED 304 (Core 14)3
HIST 1613SCED 4193
SCED 3053SCED 4604
SPED 3013SOSC 4013
Core 74 
 19 17
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MSED 3653MSED Student Teaching12
MSED 3673SCED 4013
SCED 4613 
SCED 4996 
 15 15
Total Units 129

Science / Math Content Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 273 (Core 3)4BIOL 120
120L (Core 7)
4
Core 1 (or Core 2)3EDUC 202 (Core 10)3
Core 43MATH 2154
Core 53Core 2 (or Core 1)3
Core 6 (PSYC 101 Recommended)3Core 113
 16 17
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
CHEM 121 or 121L3ISTC 3013
EDUC 203 (Core 13)3MATH 2313
GEOG 101 (Core 8)3MATH 2361
MATH 2254SCED 3053
Core 123SPED 3013
 16 13
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
BIOL 3013MATH 3253
MATH 2554MSED 3424
SCED 304 (Core 14)3PHSC 2063
SCIE 3552PHYS 2053
Core 93SCED 4604
 15 17
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 4253MSED Student Teaching 12
SCED 4613SCED 4013
SCED 4996 
SCIE 3813 
 15 15
Total Units 124

Science / Social Studies Content Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
GEOG 101 (Core 8)3BIOL 120
120L (Core 7)
4
HIST 1453GEOG 102 or 105 (Core 12)3
POSC 103 (Core 11)3GEOG 1093
SOCI 101 (Core 6)3HIST 146 or 1023
Core 1 (or Core 2)3Core 2 (or Core 1)3
Core 33 
 18 16
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ANTH 2073ECON 2013
CHEM 121
121L
4EDUC 203 (Core 13)3
EDUC 202 (Core 10)3HIST 1613
HIST 1603ISTC 3013
Core 43SCED 3053
 16 15
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
BIOL 3013MSED 3424
SCED 304 (Core 14)3PHSC 2063
SCIE 3552PHYS 2053
SPED 3013SCED 4604
SOSC 4013Core 93
Core 53 
 17 17
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MSED 3653MSED Student Teaching12
SCIE 3813SCED 4013
SCED 4613 
SCED 4996 
 15 15
Total Units 129

Social Studies / Math Content Suggested Four-Year Plan

Based on course availability and student needs and preferences, the selected sequences will probably vary from those presented below. Students should consult with their adviser to make the most appropriate elective choices.

Freshman
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
HIST 1453GEOG 102 or 105 (Core 12)3
MATH 273 (Core 3)4GEOG 1093
POSC 103 (Core 11)3HIST 102 (Core 5)3
SOCI 101 (Core 6)3MATH 2154
Core 1 (or Core 2)3Core 2 (or Core 1)3
 16 16
Sophomore
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
ANTH 2073ECON 2013
EDUC 202 (Core 10)3EDUC 203 (Core 13)3
HIST 1603HIST 1613
MATH 2254ISTC 3013
Core 43MATH 2313
 MATH 2361
 SCED 3053
 16 19
Junior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 2554MATH 3253
SCED 304 (Core 14)3MSED 3424
SOSC 4013SCED 4604
SPED 3013Core 74
Core 83-4Core 93
 16-17 18
Senior
Term 1UnitsTerm 2Units
MATH 4253MSED Student Teaching 12
MSED 3653SCED 4013
SCED 4613 
SCED 4996 
 15 15
Total Units 131-132

Standard 1: Young Adolescent Development:

Middle level teacher candidates understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development and use that knowledge in their practice. They demonstrate their ability to apply this knowledge when making curricular decisions, planning and implementing instruction, participating in middle level programs and practices, and providing healthy and effective learning environments for all young adolescents.

Element a. Knowledge of Young Adolescent Development: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of young adolescent development. They use this understanding of the intellectual, physical, social, emotional, and moral characteristics, needs, and interests of young adolescents to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for all young adolescents, including those whose language and cultures are different from their own.

Element b. Knowledge of the Implications of Diversity on Young Adolescent Development: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their understanding of the implications of diversity on the development of young adolescents. They implement curriculum and instruction that is responsive to young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition). They participate successfully in middle level practices that consider and celebrate the diversity of all young adolescents.

Element c. Implications of Young Adolescent Development for Middle Level Curriculum and Instruction. Middle level teacher candidates use their knowledge of young adolescent development when planning and implementing middle level curriculum and when selecting and using instructional strategies.

Element d. Implications of Young Adolescent Development for Middle Level Programs and Practices: Middle level teacher candidates apply their knowledge of young adolescent development when making decisions about their respective roles in creating and maintaining developmentally responsive learning environments. They demonstrate their ability to participate successfully in effective middle level school organizational practices such as interdisciplinary team organization and advisory programs.

Standard 2: Middle Level Curriculum

Middle level teacher candidates understand and use the central concepts, standards, research, and structures of content to plan and implement curriculum that develops all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter. They use their knowledge and available resources to design, implement, and evaluate challenging, developmentally responsive curriculum that results in meaningful learning outcomes. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to assist all young adolescents in understanding the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge. They design and teach curriculum that is responsive to all young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).

Element a. Subject Matter Content Knowledge: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate a depth and breadth of subject matter content knowledge in the subjects they teach (e.g., English/language arts, mathematics, reading, social studies, health, physical education, and family and consumer science). They incorporate information literacy skills and state-of-the-art technologies into teaching their subjects.

Element b. Middle Level Student Standards: Middle level teacher candidates use their knowledge of local, state, national, and common core standards to frame their teaching. They draw on their knowledge of these standards to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally responsive, meaningful, and challenging curriculum for all young adolescents.

Element c. Interdisciplinary Nature of Knowledge: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge by helping all young adolescents make connections among subject areas. They facilitate relationships among content, ideas, interests, and experiences by developing and implementing relevant, challenging, integrative, and exploratory curriculum. They provide learning opportunities that enhance information literacy (e.g., critical thinking, problem solving, evaluation of information gained) in their specialty fields (e.g., mathematics, social studies, health).

Standard 3: Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization

Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within middle level organizational components.

Element a. Middle Level Philosophical Foundations: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools.

Element b. Middle Level Organization and Best Practices: Middle level teacher candidates utilize their knowledge of the effective components of middle level programs and schools to foster equitable educational practices and to enhance learning for all students (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition). They demonstrate their ability to apply this knowledge and to function successfully within a variety of school organizational settings (e.g., grades K-8, 6-8, 7-12). Middle level teacher candidates perform successfully in middle level programs and practices such as interdisciplinary teaming, advisory programs, flexible block schedules, and common teacher planning time.

Standard 4: Middle Level Instruction and Assessment

Middle level teacher candidates understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to data-informed instruction and assessment. They employ a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies, information literacy skills, and technologies to meet the learning needs of all young adolescents (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).

Element a. Content Pedagogy: Middle level teacher candidates use their knowledge of instruction and assessment strategies that are especially effective in the subjects they teach.

Element b. Middle Level Instructional Strategies: Middle level teacher candidates employ a wide variety of effective teaching, learning, and assessment strategies. They use instructional strategies and technologies in ways that encourage exploration, creativity, and information literacy skills (e.g., critical thinking, problem solving, evaluation of information gained) so that young adolescents are actively engaged in their learning. They use instruction that is responsive to young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).

Element c. Middle Level Assessment and Data-informed Instruction: Middle level teacher candidates develop and administer assessments and use them as formative and summative tools to create meaningful learning experiences by assessing prior learning, implementing effective lessons, reflecting on young adolescent learning, and adjusting instruction based on the knowledge gained.

Element d. Young Adolescent Motivation: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to motivate all young adolescents and facilitate their learning through a wide variety of developmentally responsive materials and resources (e.g., technology, manipulative materials, information literacy skills, contemporary media). They establish equitable, caring, and productive learning environments for all young adolescents.

Standard 5: Middle Level Professional Roles

Middle level teacher candidates understand their complex roles as teachers of young adolescents. They engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as middle level professionals. They are informed advocates for young adolescents and middle level education, and work successfully with colleagues, families, community agencies, and community members. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate positive dispositions and engage in ethical professional behaviors.

Element a. Professional Roles of Middle Level Teachers: Middle level teacher candidates understand, reflect on, and are successful in their unique roles as middle level professionals (e.g., members of teaching teams and advisors to young adolescents).

Element b. Advocacy for Young Adolescents and Developmentally Responsive Schooling Practices: Middle level teacher candidates serve as advocates for all young adolescents and for developmentally responsive schooling practices. They are informed advocates for effective middle level educational practices and policies, and use their professional leadership responsibilities to create equitable opportunities for all young adolescents in order to maximize their students' learning.

Element c. Working with Family Members and Community Involvement: Middle level teacher candidates understand and value the ways diverse family structures and cultural backgrounds influence and enrich learning. They communicate and collaborate with all family members and community partners, and participate in school and community activities. They engage in practices that build positive, collaborative relationships with families from diverse cultures and backgrounds (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).

Element d. Dispositions and Professional Behaviors: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate positive orientations toward teaching young adolescents and model high standards of ethical behavior and professional competence. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, critical perspectives on their teaching.