Major in Business Administration

Accounting Courses

ACCT 201 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

Accounting and financial reporting concepts and the significance of financial accounting information in decision-making. Includes the effects of accounting events on business financial statements; planning and decision-making tools in the operating cycle; and the process of recording and communicating information.

ACCT 202 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

Managerial accounting concepts and the significance of accounting information for managerial decision-making. How managers use information to carry out three essential functions in an organization: to plan operations, to control activities, and to make managerial decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 or ACCT 211 with grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher.

ACCT 211 HONORS ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I (3)

Similar to ACCT 201 except it emphasizes more conceptual approaches to accounting and requires completion of a research paper, case studies, and practice sets. Also requires a considerable amount of computer based instruction. Prerequisites: SAT scores 550 or above, Verbal; 600 or above, Math; and Admission to the Honors College.

ACCT 212 HONORS ACCOUNTNG PRINCIPLES II (3)

Similar to ACCT 202 except it emphasizes more conceptual approaches to accounting and requires completion of a research paper, case studies, and practice sets. Also requires a considerable amount of computer based instruction. Prerequisites: SAT scores 550 or above, Verbal; 600 or above, Math; Admission to the Honors College; and ACCT 211 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher.

ACCT 300 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

A detailed review and discussion of the revenue, expenditure and other transaction processing cycles; batch, OLRT and cloud-based approaches to data processing; file-oriented and database systems; e-business infrastructure, networks and applications including data mining techniques pertaining to accounting; internal controls; and system development and accounting software selection. Students will complete projects utilizing both manual and cloud-based computerized accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or ACCT 212 with grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher.

ACCT 301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3)

Revenue recognition methods, balance sheet presentation, cash flow reporting, and accounting for changes and errors; conceptual framework of accounting; disclosure requirements. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or ACCT 212 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher.

ACCT 302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3)

Examination of electronic data processing issues involved in the design and operation of manual and computerized accounting systems related to revenues, purchasing, inventory, financial and payroll processes. Projects include a manual system and a mid-range accounting software. Discussions of database structures, e-commerce and ethics. Prerequisites: ACCT 301 and major standing.

ACCT 303 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III (3)

Analysis of equity. Reporting of earnings per share. Accounting for investments, leases, post-employment benefits and income taxes. Prerequisites: ACCT 302 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher and ACCT Major Standing.

ACCT 341 MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING I (3)

Components of several cost systems will be discussed, including process costing, job-order costing and activity-based costing (ABC). Elements of standard cost accounting, variance analysis, budgeting, and cost-volume-profit analysis will be presented. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or ACCT 212 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher.

ACCT 361 TAX ACCOUNTING I (3)

Covers federal income tax laws governing gross income, deductions, calculation of taxable income tax rates. Emphasis is placed on the effect of these laws on the income of individual taxpayers. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or ACCT 212 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher.

ACCT 362 TAX ACCOUNTING II (3)

Covers laws dealing with federal taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts, and retirement plans. Prerequisites: ACCT 361 with grade of C (2.0) or higher and ACCT major only.

ACCT 401 AUDITING I (3)

Focuses on developing a solid foundation of knowledge of auditing standards (AICPA and PCAOB), professional ethics, internal controls, reliability and validity of audit evidence and reporting, as well as an awareness of the importance of internal controls in order to avoid the many facets of fraud. Prerequisites: COMM 131 or COMM 215 and BUSX 301 or ENGL 317; ACCT 303 (may be taken concurrently); major in ACCT.

ACCT 402 AUDITING II (3)

Builds on the foundation laid out in ACCT 401. Develops the skill set relating to Audit procedures, tests of controls for various accounts, substantive procedures for various account transactions and balances including the identification of fraud risk factors which may lead to possible transactional misstatements and/or fraudulent financial statements utilizing software (such as ACL or IDEA) to download and analyze appropriate data. Prerequisites: ACCT 401; ACCT major and senior status.

ACCT 410 GOVERNMENTAL AND NOT-FOR PROFIT ACCOUNTING (3)

Accounting and financial reporting procedures for governmental and nonprofit organizations. Promulgated accounting standards, conceptual issues, and special topics will be examined. Emphasizes accounting for state and local governments, not-for-profit organizations, colleges and universities, and health care organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 303 with grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher, Accounting major only.

ACCT 412 INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING (3)

Covers international convergence of financial reporting standards and covers various international accounting theories and practices in order to provide students with necessary skills in analyzing and interpreting financial statements that are prepared by multinational and transnational corporations. Prerequisite: ACCT 303 with grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher, Accounting major only.

ACCT 421 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3)

Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized topics and current problems. Emphasis on consolidated statements and partnership accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 303 with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher; ACCT major and senior status.

ACCT 442 MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING II (3)

Development of advanced management accounting theories, the analysis of cost management systems with a strategic emphasis, and the management's use of accounting information through case analyses. Prerequisites: ACCT 341 with a grade equivalent of C (2.0) or higher and ACCT major only.

ACCT 450 FORENSIC ACCOUNTING AND FRAUD EXAMINATION (3)

Forensic accounting is an interdisciplinary study of social learning/process theories, accounting, law, and the systems of internal controls, evidence gathering, interpersonal skills, communication skills and information technology skills. Fraud examination provides foundation knowledge about fraud prevention, detection and investigation for an accountant. In this course, students will learn what occupational fraud is, how and why it is committed, how fraudulent activities can be deterred and appropriate procedures for investigating and resolving allegations of fraud. Students will utilize the IDEA software in fraud detection. Prerequisites: ACCT 300 and ACCT 302.

ACCT 470 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary business issues as they affect current accounting practices. May be repeated for credit provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ACCT 480 SUSTAINABILITY ACCOUNTING (3)

Sustainability accounting concerns the process of identifying, measuring and reporting the entities’ impact on the planet with a focus mainly on the environmental impact. The course will cover topics including economic and reporting models, sustainable capital budgeting and investing, environmental liabilities and greenhouse gas emissions. Prerequisite: ACCT major.

ACCT 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN ACCOUNTING (1-3)

Directed research on specific problems in a functional area of accounting. May be repeated for a maximum total of 6 units. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ACCT 497 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Students are required to work in assigned projects in actual accounting environments. Priority will be given to seniors; also open to highly qualified sophomores or juniors. Graded S/U. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: ACCT 301 and consent of department chair.

Business Excellence Courses

BUSX 201 FOUNDATIONS OF BUSINESS (3)

An integrated view of business organizations: study of the structure and organization of businesses, common business processes, and the interrelationships among business functions. Prerequisites: Pre-business or business major, ENGL 102 or equivalent.

BUSX 301 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3)

Seminar designed to enable students to gain the written and oral communication skills needed in professional business situations. Requires grade of C or better to fulfill Core requirement. Prerequisites: a grade of C (2.0) or higher in ENGL 102 or ENGL 190 equivalent, and ECON 202; junior/senior status. Core: Advanced Writing Seminar.

BUSX 460 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE (3)

Application of business knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA's) through professional responsibilities in employment, internship, or comparable experience. Prerequisites: BUSX 301, FIN 331, MKTG 341, MNGT 361; senior major standing; and an approved internship (milestone).

E-Business and Technology Management Courses

EBTM 250 PROBLEM SOLVING IN BUSINESS I (1)

Focus on analytic and technology skills needed to utilize spreadsheets to solve business problems. Topics covered include: managing and sharing workbooks, custom formats and layouts, creating advanced formulas, and creating advanced chart elements. To earn a satisfactory grade, students are required to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Excel Core exam and earn a MOS certification. The course can be waived if students have already obtained the Microsoft Office Specialist Excel Expert level certification. Students can repeat the course if they fail to pass and the grade will be replaced. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: major standing; sophomore and above standing.

EBTM 251 PROBLEM SOLVING IN BUSINESS II (1)

Focus on analytic and technology skills needed to utilize spreadsheets to solve business problems. Topics covered include: work with data and information in data tables, visualize data with charts, predict outcomes, and what-if analysis. Prerequisites: EBTM 250 or Microsoft Expert Excel Certification; sophomore standing or higher; major standing.

EBTM 310 INTRODUCTION TO ERP SYSTEMS (3)

Will provide a comprehensive understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems and their role in organizations. Included are key business processes including procurement, fulfillment, production, warehouse management and material planning. Processes will be discussed in terms of how they are executed and their impact on financial and managerial accounting. Covers knowledge and skills across different functional areas, including accounting, finance, operations management, sales and human capital through hands-on exercises using a major ERP system. Particular attention will be given to the integrated nature of business processes.

EBTM 337 ENTERPRISE INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

Strategic, tactical, and operational applications of enterprise information systems, e-business, and enterprise use of social media. Topics include data and knowledge management and networked computing, future trends using intelligent systems, and important enterprise resource planning systems used to integrate functional areas within organizations, collaborating with external partners, and integrating stakeholders across the value chain. Not open to students who have successfully completed MNGT 337. Prerequisites: major standing; junior/senior standing.

EBTM 340 APPLIED CRM SYSTEMS (3)

Focuses on theories and applications of customer relationship management (CRM). Important topics include CRM theory and development, the CRM process, customer data management, using CRM as a strategic marketing, sales, service, and analytical tool, and integrating social networking and CRM. The course offers students key knowledge and skills that are essential for customer analyses and marketing strategy formulation. Students will gain hands-on experience through lab assignments that require the use of transactional and analytical CRM software commonly used by businesses. Prerequisites: major standing; junior standing or higher.

EBTM 343 INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

Management of projects through planning, scheduling and controlling of organizational activities. Course includes project selection, scope development and management, cost estimation and budgeting, scheduling, staffing, resource allocation, task tracking, task sequencing, and control. Project management software will be used to support the course material. Students who have successfully completed EBTM 443 or MNGT 443 will not receive additional credit for EBTM 343. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or higher; major standing.

EBTM 350 BUSINESS ANALYTICS (3)

Focuses on using standard business analytic models to summarize and analyze data, build models, and drive impact through quantitative decision-making. Explores methods to create and frame problems, use of descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive analytics and using data to discover patterns and trends. Prerequisites: EBTM 251; junior standing or higher; major standing.

EBTM 360 ENTERPRISE RESOURCE SYSTEMS CONFIGURATION (3)

Discusses the concepts, principles and techniques for configuring organizational processes in an enterprise system. The focus is to ensure that the key organizational processes are executed efficiently and effectively. Students will learn about business processes in modern organizations, managing change to those processes, and configuring an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system to implement business process changes. Project Organization skills will be enhanced as students work on cross-functional teams to implement changes. Prerequisites: EBTM 310, major standing, junior/senior standing.

EBTM 365 PRINCIPLES OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

Strategies and techniques for service and manufacturing operations. A number of quantitative techniques are presented. Practical business applications and international competitiveness are stressed throughout the course. Students will use industry relevant software in the course. Students who have successfully completed MNGT 365 will not receive additional credit for EBTM 365. Prerequisites: (EBTM 251 or Computer Proficiency Exam) and (ECON 205 or MATH 231/MATH 233); major in ACCT, BUAD, CIS, EBUS, MATH, XBACI, XCIEB or XEBBA; junior/senior standing.

EBTM 367 E-BUSINESS INFRASTRUCTURE (3)

Introduction to e-business infrastructure topics including business data communications and networking, e-business security, and databases. Students are not only expected to master the technical aspects of those subjects through lectures and hands-on labs, but also expected to understand the business implications of those topics. Not open to students who have successfully completed EBUS 367 [ECOM 367]. Prerequisites: EBTM 337 [MNGT 337]; majors only; junior/senior standing.

EBTM 370 ERP SIMULATION AND APPLICATIONS (3)

Will provide students with the conceptual and practical understanding of ERP applications in business. The course will take students through procurement, manufacturing, and distribution applications in a simulated environment on the ERP platform. The other part of the course discusses in-memory databases such as HANA and their implications for business applications. Concepts of security are included in the discussion. Students will work on ERP software in the cloud. Prerequisites: EBTM 310, major standing, junior/senior standing.

EBTM 400 APPLIED BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE (3)

Gives students an understanding of the importance and applications of business intelligence (BI) in organizations. Its focus is on the analytical and business process uses of BI. The course will provide a high-level overview of the technical infrastructure of business intelligence, and will focus on the use of reporting and analysis tools used to extract information needed to address specific business questions and problems. Prerequisites: EBTM 310, major standing, junior/senior standing.

EBTM 419 SUPPLY-CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3)

Basic concepts and strategies adopted in SCM. Primary focus is to develop a good understanding of strategic, tactical and operational issues of SCM and become familiar with the integration of various SCM entities. A number of essential techniques of SCM are presented as supplementary materials. Topics include: transportation management and network design, e-procurement, uncertainty management, supply chain coordination & integration, value of information (sharing), global SCM, customer value and SCM, information technology/standards in SCM. Not open to students who have successfully completed MNGT 419. Prerequisites: EBTM 337 and EBTM 365; junior/senior major standing.

EBTM 425 BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS AND ANALYSIS (3)

Addresses the business analysis discipline and describes the role of the business analyst. Describes the process model for business analysis. Describes how business analysis is undertaken in various stages of the process model as well as key techniques used at each stage. The goal of the course is to prepare students with a business analysis toolkit that can be used by them to help organizations adopt business improvements to ensure their success. Prerequisites: EBTM 337 and major junior/senior standing.

EBTM 431 ADVANCED E-BUSINESS (3)

Deals with newer web-related technologies affecting the world of e-business approaches to web usability, e-collaboration tools including wikis, widgets, blogs and social networking, content management, mobile technologies, web logging and performance management, and web services. Not open to students who have successfully completed EBUS 431, ECOM 431 or MNGT 411. Prerequisites: EBTM 367; majors only: junior/senior standing.

EBTM 446 BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE (3)

Classifications of business decision problems and methods of analysis to identify the best solutions using business records for business intelligence. Methods of managing large storage of business records and related information and the discovery of knowledge to support managerial decision making. Prerequisites: major standing, EBTM 337 (MNGT 337), junior/senior standing.

EBTM 450 ADVANCED PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

Covers advanced project management topics necessary for implementation of and excellence in project management. Topics include human resource management, procurement management, contract administration, risk management, integration management, project leadership, communications management and an introduction to program and portfolio management. Project management software will be used to support the course material. Prerequisites: EBTM 343 or EBTM 443 or MNGT 443, or EBTM 604; junior/senior major standing.

EBTM 454 BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT (3)

Business Process Management concepts, architecture, and specifications, introduction to modeling/design tools used to design and optimize business processes as well as performance measuring approaches for evaluating business process performance. Prerequisites: major standing, EBTM 337 / MNGT 337, EBTM 365 /MNGT 365, junior or senior standing.

EBTM 462 PROJECT QUALITY AND SIX SIGMA (3)

Projects involving quality management and six sigma methodologies including quality improvement, process design, root cause analysis, quality measurement, and continuous improvement. Prerequisites: major standing, EBTM/MNGT 443 or EBTM 343; junior/senior standing.

EBTM 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN E-BUSINESS (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary e-Business issues. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 units. Not open to students who have successfully completed EBUS 470. Prerequisite: major senior standing.

EBTM 475 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PMBA (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary business issues as they affect current project management and business analysis practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: senior major standing.

EBTM 491 BSAP DIRECTED READINGS (3)

Assigned readings in selected areas of Business Systems and Processes (BSAP). A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent research, and internship is allowed in BSAP area of study. Minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA is required. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

EBTM 492 PMBA DIRECTED READINGS (3)

Directed readings in selected areas of Project Management and Business Analysis. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent research, and internship is allowed in the EBTM area of study. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, a minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA, and completion of all 200 and 300 level core requirements for the PMBA concentration.

EBTM 495 BSAP INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)

Directed research in specific areas of Business Systems and Processes (BSAP). A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent research, and internship is allowed in the BSAP area of study. Minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA is required. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor, completion of all 200 and 300 level core requirements, and department consent.

EBTM 496 PMBA INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3)

Independent research in specific areas of project management and business and analysis. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent research, and internship is allowed in the PMBA area of study. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, a minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA, completion of all 200 and 300 level core requirements, and a special permit.

EBTM 497 BUSINESS SYSTEMS & PROCESSES PRACTICUM (3)

Students are required to work in government or industry for a minimum of 120 hours to gain practical experience in the application of concepts and methods in Business Systems and Processes (BSAP). All positions have to be reviewed and approved by the EBTM department. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent research, and internship is allowed in the BSAP area of study. Minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA is required. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

EBTM 498 PMBA INTERNSHIP (3)

Students are required to work in government or industry for a minimum of 120 hours to gain practical experience in the application of project management and business analysis concepts. All positions have bee reviewed and approved by EBTM faculty. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent research, and intership is allowed n the PMBA area of study. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA and consent of the instructor.

Economics Courses

ECON 201 MICROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES (3)

Economic reasoning of individual choice in household and market decisions. Behavior of firms in competitive and noncompetitive markets, functioning of labor and capital markets, role of the entrepreneur and effects of government policies. Core: Social & Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 202 MACROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES (3)

Inflation and unemployment--causes and remedies. Money and banking, government spending and taxation. International trade. Core: Social & Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 203 HONORS MICROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES (3)

How private enterprise determines what is produced, prices, wages, profits. Supply and demand. Competition and monopoly. Labor unions, income distribution. Farm policy. The role of government in our economy. Not open to students who have successfully completed ECON 201. Core: Social & Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 204 HONORS MACROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES (3)

Analysis of the aggregate dimensions of the American economy. An investigation of American culture by the study of the American economy. Topics include national income and employment, inflation, economic development, business cycles, international trade, government spending and taxation. Not open to students who successfully completed ECON 202. Core: Social & Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 205 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS I (3)

Analysis and presentation of business and economic data; descriptive statistics and statistical inference; measures of central tendency and variability; probability theory; estimation; testing of hypothesis; linear regression analysis. Students who have successfully completed ECON 301 will not receive additional credit for ECON 205. Prerequisite: qualifying score on Math Placement exam or MATH 100 (recommended) or MATH 102 or higher. Core: Mathematics.

ECON 303 AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3)

Description and analysis of growth and development of U.S. economy and its institutions from colonial times to 20th century. Emphasis on "new" economic history: explicit economic models and quantitative methods to analyze historical phenomena. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 305 SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3)

A policy approach to international trade and international finance; international economic problems and issues facing the United States within the global economy. Not open to students who have had ECON 421. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 306 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS II (3)

Hypothesis testing, regression models and regression analysis featuring extensive use of Stata. Multiple and logistic regressions. Assumptions of regression analysis including diagnostics of and means to address multicollinearity, heteroskedasticity, and autocorrelation. Assessing validity of causal inference. Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, and ECON 205 or MATH 231 or equivalent. Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, and ECON 205 or MATH 231 or equivalent.

ECON 309 INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY (3)

Determination of prices, output, wages, resource allocation. Theory of the firm. Theory of competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204 and either MATH 211 or MATH 273.

ECON 310 MACROECONOMIC THEORY (3)

Impact of monetary and fiscal policy. The overall level of output, prices, employment, interest rates. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204 and either MATH 211 or MATH 273.

ECON 313 MONEY AND BANKING (3)

Organization and function of the money, credit and banking system of the United States; banking institutions, Federal Reserve System; the relation of money and credit to prices; foreign exchange. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 321 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3)

Development of economic theory; 18th and 19th century classical schools. Modern economic literature on price, investment and employment. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 322 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3)

Effects of alternative institutional arrangements on incentives and individual behavior affecting the allocation of resources. Differences between decentralized or market systems and centralized or government planning. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 326 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3)

Theory of economic growth. Problems and programs relating to less developed countries. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 330 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3)

Competition, collusion, monopoly, and oligopoly in regulated and unregulated markets. Economics of firm management, market organization, sales practices and anti trust laws. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 331 GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMIC LIFE (3)

Economics and philosophy of markets and government and criteria for judging their success: end-state vs. process, efficiency vs. equity, act and rule utilitarianism vs. natural rights. Emphasis on moral foundation of capitalism. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 334 ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION (3)

Study of the causes of poverty. How poverty and discrimination are interrelated. An analysis of existing and proposed programs to alleviate poverty and discrimination. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 337 PUBLIC FINANCE (3)

Non-market provision of goods and services at all levels of government: principles of public finance, specific public spending programs and taxes, allocation of resources and income distribution. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 339 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

Analysis of the economic organization of the health care sector of the U.S. economy; alternative health care delivery systems and methods of financing health care services; current issues in health economics. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 341 LABOR ECONOMICS AND LABOR RELATIONS (3)

The determination of wages. Labor unions: history, structure, activities, effects. Government labor policy. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 351 URBAN ECONOMICS (3)

Economic bases for the existence of metropolitan areas. The economy of the metropolitan area; its growth, income distribution, economic stability. Transportation and land use patterns. Social and other problems of metropolitan areas. Application of elementary price theory to the analysis and solution of urban issues and problems. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 370 SPORTS ECONOMICS (3)

Study of sports and the sports industry using economic models. Organized according to the fields of industrial organization, public finance, and labor economics. Topics include league makeup, stadium financing, team location, competitive balance, and incentive structures. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.

ECON 374 ECONOMIC ISSUES OF GENDER (3)

Explores the changing role of men and women in the U.S. and other economies with specific emphasis on issues such as differences in occupations and wages, theories of discrimination, the economics of the household, child care, divorce, poverty, and the effect of government programs on families. Prerequisite: ECON 201/ ECON 203.

ECON 375 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (3)

Applying tools of economic theory to issues focusing on natural resources and environmental policy. Topics include market failure, valuation of non-market goods, cost-benefit analysis and pollution. Prerequisite: ECON 201/ ECON 203.

ECON 376 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS (3)

Use of natural resources in the economy and related public policy issues emphasizing the role of property rights, markets, finance, and market failures. Topics may include resource scarcity, energy, forests, marine resources, water supply, biodiversity, land use, outdoor recreation, and international development. Prerequisite: ECON 201/ ECON 203.

ECON 380 TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3)

Economic analysis applied to a contemporary subject area in economics. Introduction of a new course for possible addition to the curriculum or a select topic given mutual faculty and student interest. May be repeated for 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204, or consent of instructor.

ECON 401 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS (3)

The problem of testing economic theories against empirical data; the formulation and estimation of regression models; the use of the method of multiple regression in testing the various hypotheses of economic theories; serial correlation; the problem of identification; application of simultaneous equation model; the use and construction of econometric models for forecasting and policy making. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204 and ECON 205 and ECON 306.

ECON 409 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3)

Applications of microeconomic theory to business policies and decisions. The utilization of analytical and decision-making tools derived mainly from economic theory, quantitative methods, finance and marketing theory. Topics considered include pricing practices and market structures, investment decision-making, and estimation of demand and cost of production. Prerequisites: ECON 309 and ECON 205 or MATH 231/ MATH 233.

ECON 411 INTRODUCTION TO GAME THEORY (3)

Introduction to game theory and strategic behavior. Dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, and signaling. applications from economics, politics, sociology, and other real-life situations. Prerequisite: ECON 309 or consent of the instructor.

ECON 419 APPLD MICROECON (3)

Applications of principles developed in price theory to problems arising in various market situations. Emphasis is on analysis and solutions of specific problems.

ECON 421 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3)

International trade theory; theory of tariffs and other trade restrictions; trade and economic growth; economic integration and trading blocks; international capital and labor flows. Prerequisites: ECON 309.

ECON 423 INTERNATIONAL MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY (3)

International issues in money and banking. Foreign exchange markets, exchange rates, and adjustment in the balance of payments. International monetary theory and its application. Prerequisite: ECON 309 and ECON 310.

ECON 431 COMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS (3)

Introduction to basic programming concepts and analysis of applied economic models using numerical methods. Procedural programming; functions; visualization; data mining; root finding algorithms; minimization routines; dynamic models. No prior programming skills required. Prerequisites: ECON 309, ECON 310, and MATH 211 or MATH 273.

ECON 441 PERSONNEL ECONOMICS (3)

Use of economics to solve practical personnel problems with specific issues in training, turnover, hiring, incentives, fringe benefits, evaluation, and legal constraints. Prerequisite: ECON 201/ ECON 203.

ECON 451 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3)

Intended primarily for students planning a graduate education in economics. A study of the fundamental mathematical methods widely used in economics: calculus and linear algebra. Emphasis is on optimization theory, economic examples are used throughout. Prerequisites: ECON 309, ECON 310 and MATH 211 or MATH 273.

ECON 470 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3)

Economic analysis applied to a contemporary subject area in economics. Introduction of a new course for possible addition to the curriculum or a select topic given mutual faculty and student interest. May be repeated for 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: ECON 309 and ECON 310, or consent of instructor.

ECON 485 SEMINAR ON ECONOMIC ISSUES (3)

Research and writing of papers on an economic issue selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: ECON 309, ECON 310 and ECON 313.

ECON 493 WORKSHOP ON ECONOMIC EDUCATION (3)

Designed to help teachers and school administrators gain a better understanding of the economic working of the society in which we live. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

ECON 495 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)

Individual and supervised study in selected areas of economics. Repeatable with a different topic for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: Economics major, junior standing, 2.50 GPA, ECON 309, ECON 310 and permission of instructor.

ECON 497 INTERNSHIP IN ECONOMICS (1-3)

Supervised work experience designed to promote an understanding of the economic system and the practical application of economic principles. Prerequisites: Economics major, junior standing, 2.50 GPA, ECON 309, ECON 310 and consent of internship coordinator. Graded S/U.

ECON 499 HONORS THESIS IN ECONOMICS (3)

Independent research completed under the close supervision of faculty thesis advisor. Prerequisites: ECON 495; 3.25 overall GPA; 3.5 GPA in ECON classes, and consent of faculty thesis adviser and honors coordinator.

Entrepreneurship Courses

ENTR 110 CREATIVITY AND IDEA DEVELOPMENT (3)

Focuses on creativity and thinking creatively. Topics include developing creative abilities, opportunity recognition, creating a new product/service, and pitches for the new product/service. Prerequisite: ENTR minor or concentration standing, or department permission.

ENTR 215 START-UP BASICS FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS (3)

Introduces students to important business concepts that will help them to run a business. Helps to prepare non-business major students with knowledge and skills needed for upper level courses in entrepreneurship. Topics covered include economics, understanding business financial measures, types of financing available to entrepreneurs and data analyses.

ENTR 305 DESIGN THINKING FOR INNOVATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING (3)

Focuses on human-centered design tools and techniques used by successful entrepreneurs to create innovative products and services. Topics include connecting insights to inspiration, identifying opportunities, building empathy for people designed for, and pursuing actions to bring solutions to market. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ENTR 310 WILL YOUR BUSINESS WORK? (3)

Understand how to identify and assess new venture opportunities. Overview of the entrepreneurial process that addresses the issues, decisions, and problems that entrepreneurs face while creating or managing new or small enterprises. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ENTR 345 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIETY (3)

Entrepreneurship and the creation of new ventures continue to have an amazing impact on economies and societies. Discover why and how this is happening by examining how entrepreneurship has evolved, by historical examples in multiple cultures, and how the past shapes entrepreneurship today. Prerequisites: BUAD major or ENTR minor; junior standing.

ENTR 355 ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOUNDATIONS AND PATHWAYS (3)

Introduces the entrepreneurial process including a focus on the identification and evaluation of opportunities. Discusses the importance of innovation, creating a business concept and business models. Develop business ideas and evaluate them for potential formation of a new venture.

ENTR 380 SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

Interest in Social Entrepreneurship (SE) has been growing both domestically and internationally. Many people have a desire to make the world a better place and are utilizing SE to create mission-driven ventures. Social entrepreneurs expand the role of entrepreneurship beyond mere innovation and profit. This course helps students understand how SE uses traditional entrepreneurship practices of innovation, adaptability and opportunity exploration to address social needs. Prerequisite: BUAD major or ENTR minor.

ENTR 401 CONSULTING WORKSHOP (3)

Series of modules that addresses various aspects of the consulting experience and involves actual consulting interventions. Prerequisites: ENTR 355; major in ACCT, BUAD, EBUS, or ECON; minor in ENTR; junior/senior standing.

ENTR 402 FAMILY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3)

Distinctive strategies, structures, and skills required to lead closely-held and family firms through change and growth. The agency relationship between ownership and management has specific dynamics and strategic challenges when facing change and growth. Prerequisites: ENTR 355; major in ACCT, BUAD, EBUS, or ECON, or minor in ENTR; junior/senior standing.

ENTR 403 INTERNATIONAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

Focuses on expanding the students' knowledge of entrepreneurship by applying it in an international context. Students will be exposed to the processes and challenges associated with a business entering foreign markets. Students will learn to identify the differences between domestic and international entrepreneurship, identify and evaluate the opportunities for international ventures, develop a persuasive business plan pertaining not only to foreign market entry or international entrepreneurship, but also to born-globals and international corporate venturing. Through working through real business problems, students will develop the skills necessary to implement appropriate marketing/R&D/innovation strategies for international entrepreneurial success. The course also addresses various topics related to the broader field of entrepreneurship, such as international consulting, as well as managing a family business in the process of internationalization. Prerequisites: major in ACCT, BUAD, EBUS, or ECON; minor in ENTR; junior or senior standing.

ENTR 410 BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION (3)

Focuses on developing a business plan for a successful new venture. Topics include opportunity evaluation, feasibility analysis, creating persuasive pitches for the business idea, competitive analysis, profiling the target market, developing financial forecasts and presentation of a business plan in a competitive style format. Prerequisites: ENTR 355, BUAD major or ENTR minor.

ENTR 470 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary business issues and how they affect current entrepreneurship practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: BUAD major or ENTR minor; sophomore/junior/senior standing.

ENTR 498 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURE MANAGEMENT (3)

Provides students the opportunity to apply concepts, research techniques, analytical thinking, report writing, and negotiation skills. The course is case-based in which the students will consider problems from the perspective of entrepreneurs, small business managers and consultants. The cases, based on actual organizations, will contain complex problems relevant to entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: ENTR 355; major in BUAD or minor in ENTR; senior standing.

Finance Courses

FIN 330 ESSENTIALS OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

Provides an overview of the basic principles of financial management for non-business majors. Provides a basic understanding of finance concepts and an exposure to fundamental financial analysis. Topics covered include financial statements, time value of money, securities characteristics and valuation, capital budgeting and working capital management. Not available to PBUA, PACT, PEBU, BUAD, ACCT, ACSC, XBACI, XEBBA, XCIEB, ECON-FNEC, and EBUS majors. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing; ACCT 201 (or ACCT 211), ACCT 202 (or ACCT 212), ECON 201 (or ECON 203), ECON 202 (or ECON 204), and either MATH 231 (or MATH 233) or ECON 205.

FIN 331 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

Introductory course designed to provide students with the fundamental concepts underlying the theory of finance. Financial markets, security valuation, analysis of financial condition, forecasting, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, leverage, optimal capital structure, dividend policy. Prerequisites: ACCT 201, ACCT 202, ECON 201, ECON 202 and (ECON 205 or MATH 231); junior/senior standing; major standing.

FIN 333 INVESTMENTS AND EQUITY SECURITY ANALYSIS (3)

Analysis of financial assets, including equities and fixed income instruments. Topics include securities valuation, use of fundamental and technical analysis, and portfolio management. Valuation of corporate securities, institutional factors, security analysis, and portfolio management. Prerequisites: FIN 331; junior major standing.

FIN 350 FINANCIAL MODELING IN CORPORATE FINANCE (3)

Learning financial modeling skills using Excel is an integral component of this course. The course emphasizes the application of powerful spreadsheet features of Excel in building flexible financial models. Topics include designing models for time of value money, financial statement analysis and forecast, security valuation including stock and bond, and models for financing decision making. Prerequisites: FIN 331, junior/senior and major standing.

FIN 351 ADVANCED CORPORATE FINANCE (3)

Applying financial modeling skills using Excel is an integral component of this course. Equipped with basic finance knowledge and modeling skills from FIN 350, students are to apply concepts, approaches, and technology for supporting the decision-making process to solve a wide variety of financial problems. Topcs include Capital Budgeting, Enterprise Valuation Models, Capital Structure Theory, Corporate Payout Policy, and Mergers and Acquisitions. Prerequisites: FIN 350, junior/senior and major standing.

FIN 423 INVESTMENTS AND FIXED INCOME SECURITY ANALYSIS (3)

An in-depth analysis of fixed income securities, swaps, options, futures and forward contracts. Analyzing financial securities, determining their values and use of specific financial goals, emphasizing nontraditional securities. Prerequisites: FIN 333; senior status and major standing.

FIN 430 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND MANAGEMENT OF RISK (3)

Discussion of the Federal Reserve including the goals and methods of monetary policy, an examination of financial institutions with an emphasis on depository institutions. Focus on identifying the risks faced by financial institutions and the management of the most important risks. Prerequisites: FIN 350 and FIN 333; senior major standing.

FIN 433 PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3)

Provides comprehensive and detailed examination of investment portfolio strategies for individuals and institutions. Portfolio strategies covered include strategic and tactical asset allocation and indexing. Other topics covered include investment policy, diversification, stock screening, and asset selection. Prerequisites: FIN 423; senior status; and major standing in BUAD or ECON or minor standing in FIN.

FIN 435 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3)

Framework of international finance, including balance of payments, foreign exchange, foreign money and capital markets, and financial management of the multinational corporation. Prerequisite: FIN 331. Major standing.

FIN 436 GLOBAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

Examination of the operation and decision making of multinational firms. Topics include global financial environment, foreign exchange theory and markets, foreign exchange exposure and risk management, global financing and investment decisions. Prerequisites: FIN 333; major in ACCT, BUAD, ECON or minor in FIN; junior or senior standing.

FIN 439 FINANCIAL VALUATION AND STRATEGY (3)

Case based approach to financial valuation and strategic decision-making using advanced financial modeling techniques. Topics include Financial Statement Analysis Modeling, Valuation Methodologies, Cost of Capital estimation, evaluation of Capital Structure Choices, LBO modeling, and the economic analysis of alternative corporate restricting strategies such as Mergers and Acquisitions, and Divestitures. Prerequisites: FIN 351; senior major standing.

FIN 470 TOPICS IN FINANCE (3)

In-depth study of contemporary issues in finance. Course content varies with each topic. May be repeated for credit provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: FIN 351.

FIN 491 SEMINAR IN FINANCE (3)

Selected areas of interest in the field of finance. Course content varies. Prerequisite: FIN 351.

FIN 495 INDEPENDANT RESEARCH IN FINANCE (1-3)

Directed in-depth academic research in finance in a specific area of joint faculty member/student interest. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: FIN 351; minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA, consent of instructor and chair. Special permit.

FIN 496 PRACTICUM IN CORPORATE FINANCE (3)

Capstone application of knowledge, skills and attitudes through professional experience. Prerequisites: FIN 351; senior status.

FIN 497 INTERNSHIP IN FINANCE (3)

Students are required to work in assigned projects in business environments. Graded S/U. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: FIN 350, declared CBE major with Finance. Minimum of 2.50 cumulative GPA. Consent of instructor and chair. Special permit.

Financial Planning Courses

FPLN 341 FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCIAL PLANNING (3)

Introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of the financial planning process. Topics include setting client goals and objectives, investment planning, tax planning, insurance and risk management, and estate planning. Overview of personal financial planning. Prerequisites: ACCT 201, ACCT 202, ECON 201, ECON 202; junior/senior standing.

FPLN 441 RETIREMENT PLANNING AND EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (3)

Designed to provide students with the background necessary to assist clients in planning for their retirement. Provide students with an understanding of the contributions employee benefits plans make toward achieving financial independence. Developing a systematic approach to estimating contribution plans, IRA, 401K, tax-sheltered annuities and government programs.Prerequisite: FPLN 341; major in ACCT, PACT, BUAD, EBUS or ECON.

FPLN 443 ESTATE PLANNING (3)

Effects of federal tax system and other factors impacting estate planning. Prerequisite: FPLN 341; major in ACCT, PACT, BUAD, EBUS or ECON.

FPLN 450 CAPSTONE IN FINANCIAL PLANNING (3)

Designed to simulate the real-world experience of financial planning. To successfully complete the course students must integrate the six major areas (Financial Planning Fundamentals, Insurance Planning, Investment Analysis, Taxation, Retirement Planning, and Estate Planning) of personal financial planning to develop and present a long-term comprehensive financial plan. Designed to fulfill the capstone course requirement of the Certified Financial Planning (CFP) Board. Prerequisites: FPLN 341, FPLN 441, FPLN 443, FIN 333, and ACCT 361; major in ACCT, BUAD and ECON; senior standing.

Legal Studies Courses

LEGL 225 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS (3)

Examines the nature and sources of law, the U.S. legal system with emphasis on court jurisdiction, procedure, constitutional law, torts, criminal law, and contracts in general and as they relate to business. Students who have successfully completed BULA 225 will not receive additional credit for LEGL 225.

LEGL 226 BUSINESS LAW (3)

Law of agency, partnership, corporations, real and personal property, estates, bankruptcy, commercial paper and secured transactions. Not open to students who successfully completed BULA 226. Prerequisite: BULA 225 or LEGL 225.

LEGL 325 SPORTS LAW (3)

Review of legal background of sports and recreation, analyzing torts, contracts, anti-trust issues, constitutional and labor law. Prerequisite: BULA 225 or LEGL 225.

LEGL 326 ELDER LAW (3)

Court systems, guardianships, estates and trusts, asset planning, and Medicare/Medicaid implications. Prerequisite: junior standing.

LEGL 328 CYBER LAW: THE LAW OF THE INTERNET (3)

An introduction to the law of the Internet including security, online transactions, rights in electronic information, regulating information content and regulating online conduct. Not open to students who successfully complete EBUS 328. Prerequisite: junior major standing.

LEGL 335 EMPLOYMENT LAW (3)

Provides a conceptual and functional analysis of the legal framework of employment relations designed for managers and human resource professionals. Topics include discrimination based on race, national origin, religion, sex, affinity and sexual orientation, age, and disability and other legally protected categories; the hiring process, testing, and performance appraisal; employee privacy; wrongful discharge; employee benefits; health and safety; independent contractors; and labor unions. Students completing this course should be able to understand employment law; comply with laws and regulations; and evaluate rights, obligations, and liabilities in the employment process, from hiring and staffing to compensation and layoff. Prerequisites: LEGL 225; junior/senior standing; BUAD major.

LEGL 407 REAL ESTATE LAW (3)

Examines the fundamentals of real estate transactions from a legal and managerial perspective. Students will learn the real property legal concepts and how they apply to real property transactions. The course will be of interest to students contemplating careers in law, accounting, real estate development, real estate finance, or banking. Topics covered will include the following: the nature of property, land acquisition, types of ownership, finance, management (leasing and landlord-tenant law); disposition of real property; title and insurance, land use regulation, taxation, environmental law and regulation, and recent developments. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing; LEGL 225; BUAD, ACCT, ECON, or EBUS major.

LEGL 413 LAW FOR ENTREPRENEURS (3)

Provides students with exposure to legal issues related to businesses from an entrepreneurial perspective. Students will learn to prepare corporate documents, negotiate legal documents and analyze legal issues across various business disciplines. Students' ability to research and communicate legal principles effectively will be enhanced. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing; LEGL 225 and LEGL 226; BUAD major.

LEGL 427 LEGAL RESEARCH, WRITING AND ADVOCACY (3)

Focuses on developing, improving and enhancing students' analytical, legal research, professional writing, and advocacy skills through the study of law in a manner transferable across business disciplines. The rigors of legal research, analysis, and writing provide students with useful and practical tools that will enhance students' ability to research and analyze facts, circumstances, and issues in any business setting, and then more effectively communicate their findings both orally and in writing. Prerequisites: LEGL 225, LEGL 226 and BUSX 301; junior/senior standing; BUAD major.

LEGL 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LEGAL STUDIES (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary business issues as they affect current business law practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: junior major standing.

LEGL 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH LEGL (1-3)

Directed research in specific areas of legal studies. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent study and internship is allowed in the legal area of studies. Minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA. Prerequisites: completion of all 200- and 300-level legal requirements and department consent.

Marketing Courses

MKTG 341 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3)

Design, distribution, pricing and promotion of goods, services, places, people and causes of both national and international markets. Included is an introduction to strategic and tactical applications of marketing. Not open to students who have completed MKTG T41. Prerequisites: ECON 201; sophomore standing (subject to availability); majors and eligible pre-major, BUAD, MKTG or MUID minor.

MKTG 345 MANAGING INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS (3)

Focuses on planning and managing the integrated marketing communications (IMC) program of an organization. Topics include advertising, direct marketing, consumer and trade promotions, and public relations. Emphasis will be placed on strategic planning to effectively use promotional tools to meet marketing goals. Various regulatory, social, and economic factors that affect an organization's IMC program will be examined. Prerequisites: MKTG 451 or MKTG 431; major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; Junior/Senior standing.

MKTG 347 SERVICES MARKETING (3)

Examines the marketing of services. The uniqueness of services marketing will be analyzed along with the similarities to product marketing. Selected topics among the following services will be examined: health care, museums, government services, travel, transportation, food, education, banking, and legal services. The service aspects of product marketing will also be analyzed. Prerequisites: MKTG 451 or MKTG 431; Major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; Junior/Senior standing.

MKTG 349 PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (3)

Development of new goods and services, including idea generation, concept evaluation, test marketing, and product launch. Prerequisites: MKTG 341 and junior major standing.

MKTG 350 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING (3)

Examines how start-up and small/medium-sized companies identify and critically evaluate opportunities that exist within new and established market niches and develop marketing plans to take advantage of those opportunities based on the creative use of scarce resources. Prerequisites: MKTG 341, junior / senior and major standing.

MKTG 355 RETAIL MANAGEMENT (3)

Provides students with an in-depth knowledge of marketing activities at the retail level in the business environment. Different types of retail institutions are examined as to the types of strategies employed in the performance of major functions, such as buying, merchandising, selling, advertising, and physical operation. Key issues, such as market segmentation, geographical location and internal organization, are analyzed. Prerequisites: MKTG 451 or MKTG 431; major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 361 MARKETING FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3)

Analyzing marketing management approaches and techniques for non-profit sector; market-driven organizations, developing resources, designing and implementing the marketing mix. Prerequisites: MKTG 451 or MKTG 431 and major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 411 DIGITAL MARKETING (3)

Design, implementation, and assessment of digital marketing strategies that deliver value to customers, stakeholders, and the organization. Introduction to integrated digital communication strategies for brand management. Not open to students who have successfully completed EBTM 411/EBUS 411/ECOM 411. Prerequisites: MKTG 341, majors only; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 425 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3)

An examination of the buying behavior of individual and organizational buyers with regards to the decision process utilized when purchasing goods and services and the resulting consequences in the development of marketing strategies by business firms, and other organizations. Prerequisites: MKTG 341; major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 431 MARKETING ANALYTICS (3)

Assemble, manipulate, and synthesize internal and external secondary data to develop sophisticated situation analyses, empirical-based customer segmentation classifications and behavioral analyses, and metrics by which firms can evaluate their marketing strategies and dynamics. Prerequisites: MKTG 341; majors only; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 441 MARKETING RESEARCH (3)

Students develop skills in the total research process, including the use of scientific methods for the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of marketing data. Includes coverage of primary research, secondary data sources and marketing information systems. Students receive an overview of exploratory, descriptive and causal research designs, as well as an understanding of sampling theory, questionnaire design, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Prerequisites: ECON 205 or MATH 231 or equivalent; MKTG 341/ MKTG 342; majors only; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 445 GLOBAL MARKETING (3)

Impact of globalization, inter-country trade agreements, and national culture on country marketing environments and their influence on strategic marketing decisions related to pricing, product, channels of distribution, and marketing communications. Problems and obstacles related to acquiring information to guide market entry decisions and development of country marketing plans and policies. Prerequisites: MKTG 425; major in ACCT, BUAD, INST-BA or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 451 PERSONAL SELLING (3)

The role and principles of personal selling as it relates to an organization's marketing strategy, specific techniques for uncovering customer needs and delivering effective sales presentations, and the critical nature of building interpersonal relationships throughout a sales cycle. Prerequisites: MKTG 341; major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 452 ADVANCED SELLING AND SALES MANAGEMENT (3)

Will prepare students for excellence in a professional selling position, as well as examine the elements of an effective salesforce as a key component of the organization's total marketing effort. Course objectives include understanding the sales process, team selling, salesforce structure, customer relationship management (CRM), uses of technology to improve salesforce effectiveness, and issues in recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, and compensating salespeople. Prerequisites: MKTG 451; BUAD major or MKTG minor; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary business issues and how they affect current marketing practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: MKTG 451 or MKTG 431; major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.

MKTG 485 STRATEGIC MARKETING (3)

Capstone course emphasizing management of marketing activities and the development and implementation of product, pricing, promotion and distribution strategies within an interdisciplinary context. Prerequisites: MKTG 341; 6 additional units from the following: MKTG 411, MKTG 425, MKTG 431, MKTG 441, MKTG 445, MKTG 451; BUAD major; senior standing.

MKTG 491 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3)

Assigned readings in selected functional or conceptual areas of marketing. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent study and internship is allowed in the marketing area study. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor, a minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA, completion of all 200- and 300- level BUAD core requirements, 2 additional Marketing courses, and a special permit.

MKTG 494 MARKETING STUDY ABROAD (3)

On-site course of study of the culture, history, economy, society, and political structure of the country and region visited as it relates to marketing and related business activities. This course may be structured as a study group accompanied by TU Department of Marketing faculty member or a course with an approved affiliated study abroad program. Prerequisites: MKTG 341; Marketing majors only; junior standing; must be registered in an approved study abroad program; and consent of the department chair.

MKTG 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)

Directed research on specific problems in a functional area of marketing. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent study and internship is allowed in the marketing area of study. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor, a minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA, completion of all 200- and 300-level BUAD core requirements, 2 additional Marketing courses, and a special permit.

MKTG 497 MARKETING INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Students are required to work a minimum of 40 hours per unit in an actual business environment to gain practical application of marketing concepts. Upon completion, a formal portfolio presentation of the internship experience is required. A total of 6 units for any combination of directed readings, independent study and internship is allowed in the marketing area of study. S/U Grading. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, consent of the department, completion of all 200- and 300-level BUAD requirements and either 1) a minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA and completion of two 400-level Marketing courses or 2) a minimum of 3.20 GPA and completion of one 400-level Marketing course.

Management Courses

MNGT 361 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (3)

Experience how leadership impacts organizational culture, strategy, and performance. Topics include making strategic decisions; leading and motivating; building and managing teams; managing communication, conflict, and power dynamics; human resource management; entrepreneurship; international business. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing.

MNGT 375 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)

The global dimensions and interdependencies of business: political environments, cultural context, international firms' strategies and market entry. Elements of international finance including international monetary systems, foreign exchange and global trade theory. Prerequisites: major in ACCT, BUAD, EBUS, PBUA, ECON or INST; junior standing.

MNGT 381 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

Techniques and issues in acquiring, developing, motivating, and maintaining a competent work force. Topics include equal employment opportunity, human resource planning, recruitment and selection, training and development, performance evaluations, motivation, compensation and benefits, labor relations, and safety and health. Prerequisites: MNGT 361; major in ACCT, BUAD, EBUS, ECON, or MUSE; junior standing.

MNGT 391 DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT AND TEAM BUILDING SKILLS (3)

Essential managerial and team building skills needed for success in organizations. Designed to help students master skills using a five-step active learning model containing steps of skill assessment, skill learning, skill analysis, skill practice, and skill application. Topics include creating a team, planning and communicating in a team, leading a team, gaining power and influence, developing self-awareness, managing stress, creative problem-solving, motivation, and effective team performance. Not open to students who have successfully completed MNGT 415. Prerequisites: MNGT 361, junior and BUAD major standing.

MNGT 395 MANAGEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3)

Organizational behavior as a means to understand, explain, and improve human behavior and interactions: job performance, work motivation, job attitudes, trust and justice, work teams, power/politics and influence, leadership stress/ well-being at work, career management, decision making, and organizational effectiveness. Students who have successfully completed MNGT 421 would not receive additional credit for MNGT 395. Prerequisites: MNGT 361; junior/senior major standing.

MNGT 425 ORGANIZATION THEORY AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

Analysis and design of learning organizations emphasizing real life situations, including internal and external organizational environments, knowledge management, innovation and change, organizational growth and life cycles, size and complexity, intergroup relations and conflict, values and culture, and decision making processes. Prerequisites: senior major standing, MNGT 361.

MNGT 433 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS (3)

The role of compensation administration in HRM, including procedures for designing and administering a compensation system, the special aspects of pay-for-performance systems as well as indirect compensation (benefits). Prerequisites: senior major standing, MNGT 381.

MNGT 435 TRAINING, DEVELOPMENT, AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (3)

An in-depth coverage of key functional areas of human resource management including training, development, and performance management from strategic perspectives. Students will learn how to sustain a competitive advantage by managing an organization's people, rather than its product or technology. The content includes: review of theoretical frameworks, review of empirical researches, development and implementation of programs, and other contemporary issues in training, development and performance management. Prerequisites: MNGT 361 and MNGT 381; major in BUAD; senior standing.

MNGT 438 MULTINATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3)

Focuses on the strategic and organizational aspects of international management. Topics covered in the course include the international environment and interdependence of international business, management in developing countries and transition economies, international corporate strategy formulation and implementation, global strategic alliances, organizational design for multinational management, regional strategy for MNCs, and functional strategic issues (HRM, global management cadre, international organized labor). Prerequisites: MNGT 361 and MNGT 375; major in ACCT, BUAD, EBUS or INST; senior standing.

MNGT 452 STAFFING AND RETENTION (3)

Staffing and retention process in organizations, including job analysis, legal compliance, recruitment, selection, matching the person with the organization, and retaining valuable employees. Prerequisites: senior major standing; MNGT 361; MNGT 381.

MNGT 453 CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN BUSINESS (3)

Resolving disputes in business operations through negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation. Buyer/seller disputes, management salary negotiations, service contractor disputes, and real estate issues. Prerequisites: MNGT 361; junior/senior major standing.

MNGT 463 ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP (3)

An array of leadership theories, research findings and practical applications covering participatory leadership, followership, power and influence, contingency perspectives, and leadership in decision making groups, charismatic and strategic leadership in organizations. Prerequisites: MNGT 361; junior/senior major standing.

MNGT 465 LEADERSHIP, LEARNING, AND CHANGE (3)

Focuses on how transformational leaders initiate and enact change-oriented strategies in order to stimulate and inspire innovation and creativity in organizations. Readings, multimedia assignments, web-forum interactions, and creative use of technologies are designed to instigate self-reflection and gain feedback on how our identity shapes creative use of design-thinking to inspire innovation, influence, and impression-management techniques. Prerequisites: MNGT 395; senior major standing.

MNGT 466 LEADING ACROSS INTERNATIONAL CULTURES (3)

Focuses on developing the students' knowledge and skills necessary to be successful leaders in multinational/multicultural organizations. Students will learn effective identification and management of the cultural components of organizational and business dynamics, practice cross-cultural communication with an emphasis on cross-cultural negotiations, analyze the process of developing and motivating a globally competent workforce, and advance other relevant cross-cultural leadership skills. Prerequisites: MNGT 361; major in ACCT, BUAD or EBUS; senior standing.

MNGT 470 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (3)

Course content varies with each topic. In-depth study of contemporary business issues as they affect current management practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units provided a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Special permit only.

MNGT 481 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3)

Business Policy and Strategy Capstone. Develops strategic thinking skills that integrate and build on the concepts and practices from functional business courses. Students will practice in-depth analysis of industries and competitors, and work to understand how managers must develop and implement strategies that generate sustainable value for all stakeholders by positioning the organization successfully in its competitive environment. Features a signature CBE experiential Live Strategy Case Competition with corporate partners. Must be taken at TU. Prerequisite: BUSX 301; FIN 331, MKTG 341, MNGT 361 and either EBTM 337 or ACCT 300; major in ACCT, BUAD, or EBUS; senior standing.

MNGT 482 BUSINESS ETHICS AND SUSTAINABILITY (3)

Intended to help students understand different perspectives on ethical problems and to introduce students to different processes and techniques that will be helpful in reaching sound judgments. Course topics will include ethical reasoning, stakeholder analysis, corporate social responsibility and environmental sustainability. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing, BUSX 301. Core: Ethical Issues & Perspectives.

MNGT 483 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

The critical role of human resource management in achieving an organization's strategic objectives. Techniques for developing a holistic, integrated approach towards the various human resource functions aligned with the organization's strategy, and comparison and contrast of traditional human resource management models. Prerequisites: MNGT 381; senior standing; major in BUAD.

MNGT 491 DIRECTED READINGS-MANAGEMENT (1-3)

Assigned readings in selected areas of management. A total of 6 units for any combination of Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Internship is allowed in the Management area of study. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor, a minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA, completion of all 200- and 300-level management core requirements, and a special permit.

MNGT 494 STUDY ABROAD IN MANAGEMENT (3)

Student must be a BUAD major and have junior standing. Student must be registered in an approved study abroad program and obtain consent of the department chair.

MNGT 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH-MANAGEMENT (1-3)

Directed research in specific areas of management. A total of 6 units for any combination of Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Internship is allowed in the Management area of study. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor, a minimum of 3.00 cumulative GPA, completion of all 200- and 300-level management core requirements, and a special permit.

MNGT 497 MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Students are required to work in government or industry for a minimum of 120 hours to gain practical experience in the application of management concepts. All positions have been reviewed and approved by management faculty. A total of 6 units for any combination of Directed Readings, Independent Study, and Internship is allowed in the Management area of study. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor, a minimum 3.00 cumulative GPA, completion of MKTG 341/MKTG 342, MNGT 361 and FIN 331, and special permit.

MNGT 498 PRACTICUM IN MANAGEMENT (3)

Synthesis of Management knowledge, skills and attitudes through professional responsibilities in employment, internship or comparable experience. Prerequisite: senior standing.

Faculty

Professors: Babu Baradwaj, Jan Baum (Director - Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship ), Philippe Duverger (Graduate Program Director), Susan Flaherty (Chairperson), Martin Freedman (Graduate Program Director), George Georgiou, Seth Gitter, Seth Hammer, Chaodong Han (Interim Chair), Bharat Jain, Juergen Jung, Xiaolin Li, James Manley, Charles Martin, Barindra Nag, Sharma Pillutla, Thomas Rhoads, Douglas Sanford, Andrew Schiff, Erin Steffes (Chairperson), Rodney Stump, Filiz Tabak (Chairperson), Tamara Woroby, Dong-Qing Yao

Associate Professors: Shantanu Bagchi, David Brannon, Matthew Chambers (Chairperson), Finn Christensen, Bart Debicki, Michael Dewally, Lijing Du, Islam Elshahat, Melissa Groves, Nhung Hendy, Jian Huang, Steven Isberg (Chairperson), Yong-Yeon Ji, Mariana Lebron, Tesfaye Lemma, James Otto, JinDong Park, Neeraj Parolia, Plamen Peev, Shanshan Qian, Arundhati Rao, Jorge Romero, Charles Russo, Natalie Scala (Graduate Program Director), Yingying Shao, Timothy Sullivan, Veronica Thomas, Stella Tomasi, Yongchen Zhao

Assistant Professors: Mehrzad Azmi Shabestari, Isaac Bonaparte, Barry Buchoff, Hua Chang, Tanja Darden, Rachel Gordon, Leila Khoshghadam, Donald Kopka Jr, Gauri Kulkarni, Sarah Magnotta, Hooman Mirahmad, Mona Mohamed, Anna Obedkova, Hiroko Okajima, Sasha Pustovit, Vinish Shrestha, R. Gabrielle Swab, Zhen (Jen) Zhang

Senior Lecturer: Chinedum Nwadiora

Lecturers: Howard Baetjer Jr., Don Cole, William Cook, Soheila Fardanesh, Mark Flores, Raquel Frye, Meg Hazra, Trevor Iles, Steve Jaworski, Robert Kasmir, Stacy Knight, Sam Leppo II, Jason Palmateer, Rana Rassipour, Mohan Sundaram, John Varvaris, Alice Zhang, Joseph Zuccaro

Visiting Instructors: Kenneth Coriale, Vanecia Fluelling